Six “New ACT Essay” Prompts

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ACT

Posts

53

Posted by

u/jordanheston

32 9 months ago

Archived

Cracking the ACT Essay | Tips from a 12-scorer

Hey, r/ACT ,

So lately I have received a lot of DMs regarding the ACT essay. It seems to me most people are just stumped with how this essay is formatted and how to approach it, logically though, as this essay is really like no other essay you will ever write. There, of course, are plenty of online resources that attempt to explain the format and approach and several practice tests that host a myriad of distinct prompts, but never seem to address the fundamental issues that surround this essay and its nauseating strategies. I would like to be of aid in this manner and address how I approached the essay and how I believe it is much easier to score in the 10+ range than it is made out to be.

First, I will tell you about my experience. As I have previously explained, I am a junior and have only tested once (December). I made a 32 C with a 12 writing. I had prepared for about a week before the exam, took one practice test two days before the exam date, and wrote one essay the day before the exam just to get a grip of what it was all about. No, it does not take months to perfect this essay. I fact, when you begin to view it under the lens I ascribe, I am sure you will begin to see the pieces fall in place.

So, how did I approach it? Ultimately, as a game. It is a silly little game that does not assess your writing skills even in the slightest, but demonstrates how well you CAN PLAY YOUR READERS. For those of you unaware, the ACT Writing section gives you a general prompt, followed by three "Perspectives." This prompt always revolves around the status quo and social issues within it, say Robots, Global Warming, Bullying, etc. The three perspectives are simple boxes that all take a different opinion towards the prompt presented most always one being for, one against, and one neutral/centrist. This is the struggle I think people find with the essay. What the hell are the perspectives for, and how do I use them? ACT inc. says you need to "critically" engage with at least two of the perspectives whilst generating your own unique approach. So, how do we do this, and how do we roll in the 10+ gravy?

This should always, ALWAYS, be an expository essay. I recommend intro, two body paragraphs, and a conclusion. As all expository essays follow, your intro should contain an attention-grabbing statement a lead-in to the thesis (bridge), and a thesis. The body paragraphs, per normal, should have a topic sentence, explanation of that topic sentence, claim, evidence, and warrant. The conclusion should make a general claim about your perspective, have a reiteration of the thesis, and close with a reiteration of the idea presented in the attention-grabbing statement. The introduction and conclusion really are normal, and typically don't require much outside training based on what most of you should already be aware of in essay writing. It is the bodies, this element of "critical" engagement and self-perspectives, that most commonly turns ACT essays awry.

First of all, identify the three perspectives opinion on the subject. For this explanation, we will use the example of Globalization. We need to identify which perspective is positive (or in favor) negative (not in favor), and the awkward one which lay somewhere in-between. Let us say Perspective One says something about Globalization increasing access to good and services and improves the quality of life of human beings. Perspective Two says that Globalization isn't actually happening right now, but something different. Perspective Three says Globalization increases xenophobic attitudes and promotes ethnic conflict. Now, we see how each one approaches globalization to say that Perspective One is definitely pro, Perspective Three is definitely con, and Perspective Two is weird and approaches the topic in a totally distinct way, so its our outlier. Now, to earn a 10+, we must engage with every perspective, while forming our own. This is where I will describe my formula that, as I would hope my score reflects, does exactly the job of earning that sweet, sweet Ivy-ranked essay. How? We reject each perspective and get philosophical with the prompt, of course while using selective word choice and vocabulary.

Step 1 – Make the thesis and plan the essay. Your thesis, as we should reject the perspectives in favor of our, totally distinct alternative. You should spend no more than 5 minutes planning this and it should simply be below the paper they give you with all of the information on it, where you can make notes, etc., and should contain: (Thesis -.. + a three-point outline, with Intro -… Body 1 – … and Body 2-…) The thesis should be along the lines of "While (prompt) has observed negative and positive elements we cannot say it is just (what the prompt suggests it is). In reality, the prompt is (your weird, dislocated perspective). Spend some time taking notes that will help you, like brain-storming the attention-grabbing statement, and briefly constructing what your own perspective will be about.

Step 2 – Body paragraph 1 should totally diss the pro choice, say the con misdiagnoses the issue, and begin the development of your own perspective. This is where you begin to tailor your own perspective, and by rejecting each perspective as a means to address the prompt, your perspective should always be about "analyzing" or "appreciating" the very nature of the prompt. So, here we would explain that Globalization is bad, not good like Perspective One says it is, but not bad for the reasons Perspective Three says it is. So, in these lines, we would say that Perspective One is wrong, because …, but Perspective Three "misses the forest for the trees." Here, we would suggest our alternative. For example,

"Perspective One relies on a false logic that wealth is evenly distributed in a Globalized society, which brings this Perspective to a total halt. (here is where we make our claim) Globalization is not about economic in any way, but rather societal development and the formation of new languages and dialects to communicate human nature. This is where Perspective Two, although correctly negative in nature to Globalization, makes fatal mistakes. Globalization indeed may promote conflicts, but saying that these exists due to economic livelihood rather than a divergence in regional dialects and language apparatus still dooms this perspective to critical failure."

So, here, in Step 2, we have rejected that the Prompt is a good thing (globalization bad), have began to develop our own perspective, in rejection of all the perspectives (globalization is actually a language phenomena), and claimed and justified that the negative perspective relies on false logic. This is ultimately the thoughtful formula that the ACT readers are looking for. What better to critically engage to the point of total rejection?

Step 3 – Body paragraph 2 should claim that the awkward perspective is the closest to the actual nature of the prompt, but that your unique perspective solves for its shortcomings. This may seem complicated, but all you are really doing is saying that "this weird perspective is closet to actually getting to the bottom of the prompt, but analyzing the prompt through my perspective alone is the best for interpreting the prompt. For example, again,

"Perspective Two makes the closet relationship to alternative methods to which globalization aspires, but still does not actually suggest what Globalization might actually be. Analyzing globalization as a unique evolution of language especially through social media and the development of the English lingua franca, is the absolute best method to view a world of convergence and homogeneity."

I should also mention that these are outlines. You should be much more verbose in addressing the body paragraphs. It is statistically prove that longer essays + generally higher scores. Shoot for 3+ pages. Mine was 3.75.

Step 4 – Wrap it up in the conclusion. You should begin by saying something mildly philosophical in nature of the prompt and the perspective you developed, such as "Although the Perspectives argue over the good and bad aspects of globalization, it must be understood that they misunderstand the very nature of globalization for what it actually is." From here, you should just tie a nice bow on the essay by restating your thesis and reiterating your attention-grabbing statement.

Also, the ACT Writing section should be incredibly inflated. Lots of verbosity, high-level word-choice, and truly stretching for length. This ids where your vocabulary comes in handy! But never go on so long with a single idea that it becomes redundant and ruins the quality of the essay; once it feels wrong and inappropriate, it probably is.

All in all, the ACT Writing section may seem intimidating, but following a rigid, planned method to attack it every time will ensure suggest. I believe following the method I have ascribed above will be sure to demonstrate you are a thoughtful, critically thinking student that has a love for high vocabulary and strong connotation which, really, is all the readers are looking for. This may seem totally distinct from any essay you have ever written, and that is because it is. But, for those of your struggling to compose and tackle this essay, I believe this format should work. The biggest thing to remember is evidence to justify claims. Whilst making your own perspective and attacking the premise of the two perspectives that are pro and con use examples from history, personal experience, etc., to suggest you are write and that they are wrong. In reality, this justification should be no more than 2-3 sentences. Focus length on justifying why you are right and why your perspective is best.

I know this post is gigantic and is probably fairly confusing, but PLEASE DM ME OR REPLY AND I WILL ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE. I am also totally down to read some essays you guys have developed and score them and give advice. Anything to help some friends get that sweet, sweet 12.

Thanks for the read!

25 comments

97% Upvoted
This thread is archived
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Sort by

level 1

fjccommish

5 points · 9 months ago

Terrific post, but your examples would receive low scores for Language Use.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Haha, you're exactly right! I thought I made notice of that, but yes, these are outlines and just general examples that would not be good for an actual essay. Just some explanatory frameworks.

level 3

fjccommish

6 points · 9 months ago

I skimmed rather than read the whole thing. My bad for missing that it's an outline.

It's an excellent resource for the essay. Thanks.

level 4

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Absolutely, if you or anyone have any questions regarding how I phrased something or questions regarding my method, feel free to DM me!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Also, thanks! 🙂

level 1

BicarbonateHCO3-

353 points · 9 months ago

I'm done with the ACT but decided to read anyway – excellent stuff, man. Congrats on your 12 and I believe this post will be very helpful to many test takers.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Thanks so much! 🙂

level 1

pho-dog-grapher

362 points · 9 months ago

Thanks soooo much for writing this all out. I haven't been able to find any good tips until now! Two questions – should I double space/write every other line? And is it okay to use a first person pov ?

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Thanks for the comment! 1. No, definitely do not double-space. This may result in complications with scoring and even if it is not forbidden by policy (not sure ATM), it may delay your score. You should, however, write single spaced but with a larger size in order to maximize length. It is typical that stronger essays with longer lengths produce higher scores, and 2. This is a complicated question because it depends on the format of the essay you’d like to write. If you would like to recount personal experiences, I would encourage that. Very good basis for argumentation. However, using a true 1st POV is not a good approach to an argumentative, expository essay. You should approach this in an expository manner, and I would encourage abstaining from 1 POV. This is not an ACT. policy, but it definitely will not meet their criteria for the essay and will most probably result in a serious score deduction.

Thanks!

level 1

bkores

1 point · 9 months ago · edited 9 months ago

Post saved. Thank you so much!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Of course! Always feel free to DM with questions!

level 1

tzoutzou

1 point · 9 months ago

Will you be taking it again to get a better composite score

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Yes, in April. My STEM score was a 29 :/ So hopefully I can bring my composite to a 34/35.

level 1

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Just curious – what was your essay score breakdown? Thanks!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

When you say "breakdown" can you elaborate on what you mean?

level 3

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Score in each of the 4 writing subsections, each out of 12.

level 4

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Sure, I received a perfect 12 score 🙂 DM me any questions you may have!

Ideas And Analysis 12 Development And Support 12 Organization 12 Language Use And Conventions 12

level 5

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Congrats! I received a 12 too, but with 11 in two sections and 12 in two sections, so good job to you especially!

level 6

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Hey, a 12 is a 12! Great job to you ! 🙂

level 1

yourdadsbff

1 point · 9 months ago

The only part of this I might disagree with is your recommendation to use a "high vocabulary." As long as you make reasonable claims and justify them with evidence, like you said, you'll do well. I especially think this advice is risky for people with shitty vocabularies; you don't want to end up blatantly misusing "advanced" words in an attempt to sound smart.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

I can agree with you mostly; the only reason I suggest this to be an effective tool is the whole “play your reader” strategy. Highly proficient word choice, to a seasoned, tired reader, will be a standout quality that will, if utilized correctly, add points to the Word Choice score categories. Of course, you make a valid point concerning people with shitty vocabularies. My advice, as I would hope for it to be translated in this manner, would hopefully be contained by people’s evaluation of their own strengths. By this I mean to say that I would hope people know when enough is enough, and when they’ve created a master-fluke of garbling jargon and incoherent buzz words. Claims and argumentation is the centerpiece of my advice and I’d hope that this is ultimately what people take away, but you’re right, word-choice is a beast of its own accord that I would simply say people should evaluate their own proficiency on before running head on into bullshit, haha. Thank you for the thoughtful comment.

level 1

M2K00

341 point · 9 months ago

I'm taking the act for the first time in February. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the essay seems similar in nature to the AP Lang argumentative essay. Would it be wrong to approach it as such with a few adjustments?

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Quite honestly, it is along the lines of that form of argumentation, but the format can be squirrelly and will require a tweak to that format. I would still practice with writing a few ACT-prompt specific essays, but concerning the manner in which you approach claims, evidence, etc., I would see no problem with your approach.

level 1

funmoshe

1 point · 6 months ago

did you refer to the perspectives as "perspective 1" etc? someone told me to never refer to them as that and just say "some say.." instead, but you got a 12 so i trust your opinion!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 6 months ago

I think it’s perfectly fine to note them as “Perspective 1, Perspective 2,” etc., primarily as that is how they are listed in the test booklet. Honestly, I would avoid the “some say” or “some argue” because it’s creates a bad transition. Who says what? Who argues what? It reduces the quality of the argument what you refer to it as just a general theme rather than a conclusive perspective, especially of those given. For sure!

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r/

ACT

Posts

53

Posted by

u/jordanheston

32 9 months ago

Archived

Cracking the ACT Essay | Tips from a 12-scorer

Hey, r/ACT ,

So lately I have received a lot of DMs regarding the ACT essay. It seems to me most people are just stumped with how this essay is formatted and how to approach it, logically though, as this essay is really like no other essay you will ever write. There, of course, are plenty of online resources that attempt to explain the format and approach and several practice tests that host a myriad of distinct prompts, but never seem to address the fundamental issues that surround this essay and its nauseating strategies. I would like to be of aid in this manner and address how I approached the essay and how I believe it is much easier to score in the 10+ range than it is made out to be.

First, I will tell you about my experience. As I have previously explained, I am a junior and have only tested once (December). I made a 32 C with a 12 writing. I had prepared for about a week before the exam, took one practice test two days before the exam date, and wrote one essay the day before the exam just to get a grip of what it was all about. No, it does not take months to perfect this essay. I fact, when you begin to view it under the lens I ascribe, I am sure you will begin to see the pieces fall in place.

So, how did I approach it? Ultimately, as a game. It is a silly little game that does not assess your writing skills even in the slightest, but demonstrates how well you CAN PLAY YOUR READERS. For those of you unaware, the ACT Writing section gives you a general prompt, followed by three "Perspectives." This prompt always revolves around the status quo and social issues within it, say Robots, Global Warming, Bullying, etc. The three perspectives are simple boxes that all take a different opinion towards the prompt presented most always one being for, one against, and one neutral/centrist. This is the struggle I think people find with the essay. What the hell are the perspectives for, and how do I use them? ACT inc. says you need to "critically" engage with at least two of the perspectives whilst generating your own unique approach. So, how do we do this, and how do we roll in the 10+ gravy?

This should always, ALWAYS, be an expository essay. I recommend intro, two body paragraphs, and a conclusion. As all expository essays follow, your intro should contain an attention-grabbing statement a lead-in to the thesis (bridge), and a thesis. The body paragraphs, per normal, should have a topic sentence, explanation of that topic sentence, claim, evidence, and warrant. The conclusion should make a general claim about your perspective, have a reiteration of the thesis, and close with a reiteration of the idea presented in the attention-grabbing statement. The introduction and conclusion really are normal, and typically don't require much outside training based on what most of you should already be aware of in essay writing. It is the bodies, this element of "critical" engagement and self-perspectives, that most commonly turns ACT essays awry.

First of all, identify the three perspectives opinion on the subject. For this explanation, we will use the example of Globalization. We need to identify which perspective is positive (or in favor) negative (not in favor), and the awkward one which lay somewhere in-between. Let us say Perspective One says something about Globalization increasing access to good and services and improves the quality of life of human beings. Perspective Two says that Globalization isn't actually happening right now, but something different. Perspective Three says Globalization increases xenophobic attitudes and promotes ethnic conflict. Now, we see how each one approaches globalization to say that Perspective One is definitely pro, Perspective Three is definitely con, and Perspective Two is weird and approaches the topic in a totally distinct way, so its our outlier. Now, to earn a 10+, we must engage with every perspective, while forming our own. This is where I will describe my formula that, as I would hope my score reflects, does exactly the job of earning that sweet, sweet Ivy-ranked essay. How? We reject each perspective and get philosophical with the prompt, of course while using selective word choice and vocabulary.

Step 1 – Make the thesis and plan the essay. Your thesis, as we should reject the perspectives in favor of our, totally distinct alternative. You should spend no more than 5 minutes planning this and it should simply be below the paper they give you with all of the information on it, where you can make notes, etc., and should contain: (Thesis -.. + a three-point outline, with Intro -… Body 1 – … and Body 2-…) The thesis should be along the lines of "While (prompt) has observed negative and positive elements we cannot say it is just (what the prompt suggests it is). In reality, the prompt is (your weird, dislocated perspective). Spend some time taking notes that will help you, like brain-storming the attention-grabbing statement, and briefly constructing what your own perspective will be about.

Step 2 – Body paragraph 1 should totally diss the pro choice, say the con misdiagnoses the issue, and begin the development of your own perspective. This is where you begin to tailor your own perspective, and by rejecting each perspective as a means to address the prompt, your perspective should always be about "analyzing" or "appreciating" the very nature of the prompt. So, here we would explain that Globalization is bad, not good like Perspective One says it is, but not bad for the reasons Perspective Three says it is. So, in these lines, we would say that Perspective One is wrong, because …, but Perspective Three "misses the forest for the trees." Here, we would suggest our alternative. For example,

"Perspective One relies on a false logic that wealth is evenly distributed in a Globalized society, which brings this Perspective to a total halt. (here is where we make our claim) Globalization is not about economic in any way, but rather societal development and the formation of new languages and dialects to communicate human nature. This is where Perspective Two, although correctly negative in nature to Globalization, makes fatal mistakes. Globalization indeed may promote conflicts, but saying that these exists due to economic livelihood rather than a divergence in regional dialects and language apparatus still dooms this perspective to critical failure."

So, here, in Step 2, we have rejected that the Prompt is a good thing (globalization bad), have began to develop our own perspective, in rejection of all the perspectives (globalization is actually a language phenomena), and claimed and justified that the negative perspective relies on false logic. This is ultimately the thoughtful formula that the ACT readers are looking for. What better to critically engage to the point of total rejection?

Step 3 – Body paragraph 2 should claim that the awkward perspective is the closest to the actual nature of the prompt, but that your unique perspective solves for its shortcomings. This may seem complicated, but all you are really doing is saying that "this weird perspective is closet to actually getting to the bottom of the prompt, but analyzing the prompt through my perspective alone is the best for interpreting the prompt. For example, again,

"Perspective Two makes the closet relationship to alternative methods to which globalization aspires, but still does not actually suggest what Globalization might actually be. Analyzing globalization as a unique evolution of language especially through social media and the development of the English lingua franca, is the absolute best method to view a world of convergence and homogeneity."

I should also mention that these are outlines. You should be much more verbose in addressing the body paragraphs. It is statistically prove that longer essays + generally higher scores. Shoot for 3+ pages. Mine was 3.75.

Step 4 – Wrap it up in the conclusion. You should begin by saying something mildly philosophical in nature of the prompt and the perspective you developed, such as "Although the Perspectives argue over the good and bad aspects of globalization, it must be understood that they misunderstand the very nature of globalization for what it actually is." From here, you should just tie a nice bow on the essay by restating your thesis and reiterating your attention-grabbing statement.

Also, the ACT Writing section should be incredibly inflated. Lots of verbosity, high-level word-choice, and truly stretching for length. This ids where your vocabulary comes in handy! But never go on so long with a single idea that it becomes redundant and ruins the quality of the essay; once it feels wrong and inappropriate, it probably is.

All in all, the ACT Writing section may seem intimidating, but following a rigid, planned method to attack it every time will ensure suggest. I believe following the method I have ascribed above will be sure to demonstrate you are a thoughtful, critically thinking student that has a love for high vocabulary and strong connotation which, really, is all the readers are looking for. This may seem totally distinct from any essay you have ever written, and that is because it is. But, for those of your struggling to compose and tackle this essay, I believe this format should work. The biggest thing to remember is evidence to justify claims. Whilst making your own perspective and attacking the premise of the two perspectives that are pro and con use examples from history, personal experience, etc., to suggest you are write and that they are wrong. In reality, this justification should be no more than 2-3 sentences. Focus length on justifying why you are right and why your perspective is best.

I know this post is gigantic and is probably fairly confusing, but PLEASE DM ME OR REPLY AND I WILL ANSWER ANY QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE. I am also totally down to read some essays you guys have developed and score them and give advice. Anything to help some friends get that sweet, sweet 12.

Thanks for the read!

25 comments

97% Upvoted
This thread is archived
New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast
Sort by

level 1

fjccommish

5 points · 9 months ago

Terrific post, but your examples would receive low scores for Language Use.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Haha, you're exactly right! I thought I made notice of that, but yes, these are outlines and just general examples that would not be good for an actual essay. Just some explanatory frameworks.

level 3

fjccommish

6 points · 9 months ago

I skimmed rather than read the whole thing. My bad for missing that it's an outline.

It's an excellent resource for the essay. Thanks.

level 4

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Absolutely, if you or anyone have any questions regarding how I phrased something or questions regarding my method, feel free to DM me!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster3 points · 9 months ago

Also, thanks! 🙂

level 1

BicarbonateHCO3-

353 points · 9 months ago

I'm done with the ACT but decided to read anyway – excellent stuff, man. Congrats on your 12 and I believe this post will be very helpful to many test takers.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Thanks so much! 🙂

level 1

pho-dog-grapher

362 points · 9 months ago

Thanks soooo much for writing this all out. I haven't been able to find any good tips until now! Two questions – should I double space/write every other line? And is it okay to use a first person pov ?

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Thanks for the comment! 1. No, definitely do not double-space. This may result in complications with scoring and even if it is not forbidden by policy (not sure ATM), it may delay your score. You should, however, write single spaced but with a larger size in order to maximize length. It is typical that stronger essays with longer lengths produce higher scores, and 2. This is a complicated question because it depends on the format of the essay you’d like to write. If you would like to recount personal experiences, I would encourage that. Very good basis for argumentation. However, using a true 1st POV is not a good approach to an argumentative, expository essay. You should approach this in an expository manner, and I would encourage abstaining from 1 POV. This is not an ACT. policy, but it definitely will not meet their criteria for the essay and will most probably result in a serious score deduction.

Thanks!

level 1

bkores

1 point · 9 months ago · edited 9 months ago

Post saved. Thank you so much!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Of course! Always feel free to DM with questions!

level 1

tzoutzou

1 point · 9 months ago

Will you be taking it again to get a better composite score

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Yes, in April. My STEM score was a 29 :/ So hopefully I can bring my composite to a 34/35.

level 1

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Just curious – what was your essay score breakdown? Thanks!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

When you say "breakdown" can you elaborate on what you mean?

level 3

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Score in each of the 4 writing subsections, each out of 12.

level 4

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Sure, I received a perfect 12 score 🙂 DM me any questions you may have!

Ideas And Analysis 12 Development And Support 12 Organization 12 Language Use And Conventions 12

level 5

staticjava2

1 point · 9 months ago

Congrats! I received a 12 too, but with 11 in two sections and 12 in two sections, so good job to you especially!

level 6

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

Hey, a 12 is a 12! Great job to you ! 🙂

level 1

yourdadsbff

1 point · 9 months ago

The only part of this I might disagree with is your recommendation to use a "high vocabulary." As long as you make reasonable claims and justify them with evidence, like you said, you'll do well. I especially think this advice is risky for people with shitty vocabularies; you don't want to end up blatantly misusing "advanced" words in an attempt to sound smart.

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster2 points · 9 months ago

I can agree with you mostly; the only reason I suggest this to be an effective tool is the whole “play your reader” strategy. Highly proficient word choice, to a seasoned, tired reader, will be a standout quality that will, if utilized correctly, add points to the Word Choice score categories. Of course, you make a valid point concerning people with shitty vocabularies. My advice, as I would hope for it to be translated in this manner, would hopefully be contained by people’s evaluation of their own strengths. By this I mean to say that I would hope people know when enough is enough, and when they’ve created a master-fluke of garbling jargon and incoherent buzz words. Claims and argumentation is the centerpiece of my advice and I’d hope that this is ultimately what people take away, but you’re right, word-choice is a beast of its own accord that I would simply say people should evaluate their own proficiency on before running head on into bullshit, haha. Thank you for the thoughtful comment.

level 1

M2K00

341 point · 9 months ago

I'm taking the act for the first time in February. Correct me if I'm wrong, but the essay seems similar in nature to the AP Lang argumentative essay. Would it be wrong to approach it as such with a few adjustments?

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 9 months ago

Quite honestly, it is along the lines of that form of argumentation, but the format can be squirrelly and will require a tweak to that format. I would still practice with writing a few ACT-prompt specific essays, but concerning the manner in which you approach claims, evidence, etc., I would see no problem with your approach.

level 1

funmoshe

1 point · 6 months ago

did you refer to the perspectives as "perspective 1" etc? someone told me to never refer to them as that and just say "some say.." instead, but you got a 12 so i trust your opinion!

level 2

jordanheston

32Original Poster1 point · 6 months ago

I think it’s perfectly fine to note them as “Perspective 1, Perspective 2,” etc., primarily as that is how they are listed in the test booklet. Honestly, I would avoid the “some say” or “some argue” because it’s creates a bad transition. Who says what? Who argues what? It reduces the quality of the argument what you refer to it as just a general theme rather than a conclusive perspective, especially of those given. For sure!

Community Details
r/ACT

16.1k

Subscribers

169

Online

A forum to discuss the ACT and forms of preparation for taking the test.

Create Post
about careers press
advertise blog help
the reddit app reddit coins reddit premium reddit gifts
content policy | privacy policy
user agreement | mod policy
© 2018 Reddit, Inc. All rights reserved