Rhode Island School of Design Admission Requirements - BepalInfo

Rhode Island School of Design Admission Requirements

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Rhode Island School of Design Requirements for Admission

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What are Rhode Island School of Design’s admission requirements? While there are a lot of pieces that go into a college application, you should focus on only a few critical things:

  • GPA requirements
  • Testing requirements, including SAT and ACT requirements
  • Application requirements

In this guide we’ll cover what you need to get into Rhode Island School of Design and build a strong application.

School location: Providence, RI

This school is also known as: RISD

Admissions Rate: 27%

If you want to get in, the first thing to look at is the acceptance rate. This tells you how competitive the school is and how serious their requirements are.

The acceptance rate at Rhode Island School of Design is 27%. For every 100 applicants, 27 are admitted.

image description

This means the school is

very selective. If you meet Rhode Island School of Design’s requirements for GPA, SAT/ACT scores, and other components of the application, you have a great shot at getting in. But if you fall short on GPA or your SAT/ACT scores, you’ll have a very low chance of being admitted, even if you meet the other admissions requirements.

image description

Want to build the best possible college application?

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We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools.

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Rhode Island School of Design GPA Requirements

Many schools specify a minimum GPA requirement, but this is often just the bare minimum to submit an application without immediately getting rejected.

The GPA requirement that really matters is the GPA you need for a real chance of getting in. For this, we look at the school’s average GPA for its current students.

Average GPA: 3.5

The average GPA at Rhode Island School of Design is 3.5.

image description

(Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA.

With a GPA of 3.5, Rhode Island School of Design

requires you to be around average in your high school class. You’ll need a mix of A’s and B’s, and very few C’s. If you have a lower GPA, you can compensate with harder courses like AP or IB classes. This will help boost your weighted GPA and show your ability to take college classes.

If you’re currently a junior or senior, your GPA is hard to change in time for college applications. If your GPA is at or below the school average of 3.5, you’ll need a higher SAT or ACT score to compensate. This will help you compete effectively against other applicants who have higher GPAs than you.

SAT and ACT Requirements

Each school has different requirements for standardized testing. Most schools require the SAT or ACT, and many also require SAT subject tests.

You must take either the SAT or ACT to submit an application to Rhode Island School of Design. More importantly, you need to do well to have a strong application.

Rhode Island School of Design SAT Requirements

Many schools say they have no SAT score cutoff, but the truth is that there is a hidden SAT requirement. This is based on the school’s average score.

Average SAT: 1350 (Old: 1916)

The average SAT score composite at Rhode Island School of Design is a 1350 on the 1600 SAT scale.

On the old 2400 SAT, this corresponds to an average SAT score of 1916.

This score makes Rhode Island School of Design Moderately Competitive for SAT test scores.

image description

Rhode Island School of Design SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

The 25th percentile New SAT score is 1230, and the 75th percentile New SAT score is 1460. In other words, a 1230 on the New SAT places you below average, while a 1460 will move you up to above average.

Here’s the breakdown of new SAT scores by section:

SectionAverage25th Percentile75th Percentile
Math670600750
Reading343036
Writing343236
Composite135012301460

Rhode Island School of Design SAT Score Analysis (Old 2400 SAT)

The 25th percentile Old SAT score is 1720, and the 75th percentile SAT score is 2090. In other words, a 1720 on the Old SAT places you below average, while a 2090 puts you well above average.

Here’s the breakdown of old SAT scores by section:

SectionAverage25th Percentile75th Percentile
Math650580720
Reading635560680
Writing631580690
Composite191617202090

SAT Score Choice Policy

The Score Choice policy at your school is an important part of your testing strategy.

Rhode Island School of Design ACT Requirements

Just like for the SAT, Rhode Island School of Design likely doesn’t have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash.

Average ACT: 28

The average ACT score at Rhode Island School of Design is 28. This score makes Rhode Island School of Design Moderately Competitive for ACT scores.

image description

The 25th percentile ACT score is 25, and the 75th percentile ACT score is 32.

Even though Rhode Island School of Design likely says they have no minimum ACT requirement, if you apply with a 25 or below, you’ll have a very hard time getting in, unless you have something else very impressive in your application. There are so many applicants scoring 28 and above that a 25 will look academically weak.

ACT Score Sending Policy

If you’re taking the ACT as opposed to the SAT, you have a huge advantage in how you send scores, and this dramatically affects your testing strategy.

Here it is: when you send ACT scores to colleges, you have absolute control over which tests you send. You could take 10 tests, and only send your highest one. This is unlike the SAT, where many schools require you to send all your tests ever taken.

This means that you have more chances than you think to improve your ACT score. To try to aim for the school’s ACT requirement of 32 and above, you should try to take the ACT as many times as you can. When you have the final score that you’re happy with, you can then send only that score to all your schools.

ACT Superscore Policy

By and large, most colleges do not superscore the ACT. (Superscore means that the school takes your best section scores from all the test dates you submit, and then combines them into the best possible composite score). Thus, most schools will just take your highest ACT score from a single sitting.

However, from our research, Rhode Island School of Design is understood to superscore the ACT. We couldn’t confirm it directly from the school’s admissions website, but multiple sources confirm that the school does superscore the ACT. We recommend you call their admissions office directly for more information.

Source

Superscoring is powerful to your testing strategy, and you need to make sure you plan your testing accordingly. Of all the scores that Rhode Island School of Design receives, your application readers will consider your highest section scores across all ACT test dates you submit.

Click below to learn more about how superscoring critically affects your test strategy.

How does superscoring change your test strategy? (Click to Learn)

For example, say you submit the following 4 test scores:

EnglishMathReadingScienceComposite
Test 13216161620
Test 21632161620
Test 31616321620
Test 41616163220
Superscore3232323232

Even though the highest ACT composite you scored on any one test date was 20, Rhode Island School of Design will take your highest section score from all your test dates, then combine them to form your Superscore. You can raise your composite score from 20 to 32 in this example.

This is important for your testing strategy. Because you can choose which tests to send in, and Rhode Island School of Design forms your Superscore, you can take the ACT as many times as you want, then submit only the tests that give you the highest Superscore. Your application readers will only see that one score.

Therefore, if your ACT score is currently below a 32, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the ACT and retaking it. You have a very good chance of raising your score, which will significantly boost your chances of getting in.

Even better, because of the Superscore, you can focus all your energy on a single section at a time. If your Reading score is lower than your other sections, prep only for the Reading section, then take the ACT. Then focus on Math for the next test, and so on. This will surely give you the highest Superscore possible.

Studying for the ACT instead? Want to learn how to improve your ACT score by 4 points?

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Download our free guide on the top 5 strategies you must be using to improve your score. This guide was written by Harvard graduates and ACT perfect scorers. If you apply the strategies in this guide, you’ll study smarter and make huge score improvements.


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SAT/ACT Writing Section Requirements

Both the SAT and ACT have a Writing section that includes an essay.

Rhode Island School of Design requires you to take the SAT/ACT Writing section. They’ll use this as another factor in their admissions consideration.

SAT Subject Test Requirements

Schools vary in their SAT subject test requirements. Typically, selective schools tend to require them, while most schools in the country do not.

We did not find information that Rhode Island School of Design requires SAT subject tests, and so most likely it does not. At least 6 months before applying, you should still doublecheck just to make sure, so you have enough time to take the test.

Final Admissions Verdict

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Because this school is very selective, strong academic scores are critical to improving your chances of admission. If you’re able to score a 2090 SAT or a 32 ACT or above, you’ll have a very strong chance at getting in.

For a school as selective as Rhode Island School of Design, rounding out the rest of your application will also help. We’ll cover those details next.

But if you apply with a score below a 2090 SAT or a 32 ACT, you unfortunately have a low chance of getting in. There are just too many other applicants with high SAT/ACT scores and strong applications, and you need to compete against them.

image description

Want to build the best possible college application?

We can help. PrepScholar Admissions is the world’s best admissions consulting service. We combine world-class admissions counselors with our data-driven, proprietary admissions strategies. We’ve overseen thousands of students get into their top choice schools, from state colleges to the Ivy League.

We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools.

Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in.


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Admissions Calculator

What are your chances of admission at Rhode Island School of Design?

Chances of admission with these scores:

Here’s our custom admissions calculator. Plug in your numbers to see what your chances of getting in are.

Pick your test:

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Note: Your admission decision relies not only on your GPA and SAT/ACT scores, but also on your coursework difficulty, extracurriculars, letters of recommendation, and personal statements. This tool provides only a simplistic estimate of your chances of admission. Instead of treating this tool as a crystal ball, we recommend you consider the big picture of what your chance means:

  • 80-100%: Safety school: Strong chance of getting in
  • 50-80%: More likely than not getting in
  • 20-50%: Lower but still good chance of getting in
  • 5-20%: Reach school: Unlikely to get in, but still have a shot
  • 0-5%: Hard reach school: Very difficult to get in

We recommend you apply to schools across a range of chances. Applying to some safety schools will guarantee you have a college to go to, while applying to some reach schools will give you a shot at getting into the school at the top of your range.

How would your chances improve with a better score?

Try to take your current SAT score and add 160 points (or take your ACT score and add 4 points) to the calculator above. See how much your chances improve?

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Application Requirements

Every school requires an application with the bare essentials – high school transcript and GPA, application form, and other core information. Many schools, as explained above, also require SAT and ACT scores, as well as letters of recommendation, application essays, and interviews. We’ll cover the exact requirements of Rhode Island School of Design here.

Application Requirements Overview

  • Common Application
    Accepted
  • Universal Application
    Not accepted
  • Electronic Application
    Available
  • Essay or Personal Statement
    Required for all freshmen
  • Letters of Recommendation
    3
  • Interview
    Not required
  • Application Fee
    $60
  • Fee Waiver Available?
    Available
  • Other Notes
    Portfolio, drawing assignments required for freshmen

Testing Requirements

  • SAT or ACT
    Required
  • SAT or ACT Writing
    Required
  • SAT Subject Tests
  • Scores Due in Office
    February 1

Coursework Requirements

  • Subject
    Required Years
  • English
  • Math
  • Science
  • Foreign Language
  • Social Studies
  • History
  • Electives

Deadlines and Early Admissions

  •  

    • Offered?
      Deadline
      Notification
  • Regular Admission

    • Yes
      February 1
      None
  • Early Action

    • No

  • Early Decision

    • Yes
      November 1
      None

Admissions Office Information

  • Address:
    2
    Providence, RI 02903-2784
  • Phone:
    (401) 454-6300
  • Fax:
    (401) 454-6309
  • Email:
    [email protected]

Other Schools For You

If you’re interested in Rhode Island School of Design, you’ll probably be interested in these schools as well. We’ve divided them into 3 categories depending on how hard they are to get into, relative to Rhode Island School of Design.

image description

Reach Schools: Harder to Get Into

These schools are more selective and have higher scores than Rhode Island School of Design. If you improve your SAT score, you’ll be competitive for these schools.

School NameLocationSAT Avg (1600)SAT Avg (2400)ACT Avg
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy, NY1420137630
Boston College Chestnut Hill, MA1440205032
Boston University Boston, MA1370194629
Villanova University Villanova, PA1370194031
Binghamton University Vestal, NY1360192929
University of Texas at Austin Austin, TX1350190429
United States Military Academy West Point, NY1340189828

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Same Level: Equally Hard to Get Into

If you’re competitive for Rhode Island School of Design, these schools will offer you a similar chance of admission.

School NameLocationSAT Avg (1600)SAT Avg (2400)ACT Avg
University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, CA1330187427
American University Washington, DC1320185828
California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo San Luis Obispo, CA1300123928
Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY1310184928
University of Texas at Dallas Richardson, TX1310184628
University of Massachusetts Amherst Amherst, MA1290122627
University of Connecticut Storrs, CT1300183928

image description

Safety Schools: Easier to Get Into

If you’re currently competitive for Rhode Island School of Design, you should have no problem getting into these schools. If Rhode Island School of Design is currently out of your reach, you might already be competitive for these schools.

School NameLocationSAT Avg (1600)SAT Avg (2400)ACT Avg
Rochester Institute of Technology Rochester, NY1290181529
Penn State University Park University Park, PA1270178627
Drexel University Philadelphia, PA1270178227
Syracuse University Syracuse, NY1270177527
Hofstra University Hempstead, NY1240117827
Auburn University Auburn University, AL1250174227
University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH1230172626

image description

Want to build the best possible college application?

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We know what kinds of students colleges want to admit. We want to get you admitted to your dream schools.

Learn more about PrepScholar Admissions to maximize your chance of getting in.


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Brown University , College Essays , Essay Breakdowns

How to Write the Brown University Essays 2016-2017

Check out the Brown University Application Essays for 2017-2018

Need help on your college applications? Learn how our College Apps Program can help .

As an Ivy League institution and the seventh-oldest university in the U.S., Brown University is recognized as one of the most prestigious in the world, as well as a cornerstone of the liberal arts. Located in Providence, Rhode Island, admission is highly competitive, with 9% of applicants admitted to the class of 2020.

 

Since its founding in 1764, Brown has distinguished itself from its competitors by granting its student body an unparalleled degree of academic freedom. From its signature “open curriculum” and the tight-knit bonds that students forge with their professors to excellent opportunities outside the classroom, it is no surprise that Brown’s students are among the happiest in the country.

 

Brown is unique in several ways. For example, Brown’s most distinctive feature, the “open curriculum” (first implemented in 1969), was a revolutionary initiative committed to the free thought and empowerment of its students. To this day, Brown students are not bound by any General Education requirements and, instead, are free to sample courses from a variety of disciplines. Students can also choose to craft their own academic concentrations, resulting in unique pursuits like Social Analysis & Research, Egyptology, and Assyriology.

 

Finally, a high 9:1 student-faculty ratio and alumni in every imaginable field are powerful resources when networking for research, internship, and career opportunities. In this blog post, we’ve compiled a guide to answering Brown’s essay questions for the 2016-2017 application cycle.

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Brown University Essay Prompts

 

Why are you drawn to the area(s) of study you indicated in our Member Section, earlier in this application? If you are “undecided” or not sure which Brown concentrations match your interests, consider describing more generally the academic topics or modes of thought that engage you currently. (150 word limit)

 

While a “Why this major?” essay would normally require you to specifically address the reasons you chose the major, the qualifications you possess for that major, and the reasons you like Brown’s program of study for that major, because you only have 150 words, you should pick just one of these aspects to highlight.

 

Specific details about Brown are only required if you plan on addressing why Brown’s program (Mathematics, for example) appeals to you. Otherwise, you should focus on more intrinsic factors such as why you want to study math (ideally more than just for career reasons), why you enjoy doing math, or why you’re qualified to study math at Brown.

 

For example, you could point to your favorite type of math and briefly analyze why it appeals to you. Alternatively, you could discuss an extracurricular activity (such as Math League) that introduced you to the joys of competitive math. If by some chance you can’t come up with a specific major to discuss, then your essay should focus on the opportunities that Brown offers you. In particular, you should look to highlight Brown’s liberal arts curriculum, as well as the academic flexibility it offers to students. 

 

Why Brown? (150 word limit)

 

“Why Brown?” is a similar prompt to most other “Why this school?” essays, however, with just 150 words to work with, the essay is in the awkward position of being too short to develop a fully fleshed-out essay with some sort of vehicle, but too long to be a short consideration of one specific characteristic of the school.

 

Things that you definitely want to highlight in your essay include Brown’s emphasis on learning (versus output, i.e. grades), the collaborative spirit of the student body, and the school’s academic flexibility. However, if you highlight these factors during a general response to the major prompt, then you should do some research on the school to find other things to highlight.

 

Tell us where you have lived — and for how long — since you were born; whether you’ve always lived in the same place, or perhaps in a variety of places. (100 word limit)

 

Regardless of whether you’ve moved around a lot or stayed in the same town your entire life, this question allows you to reveal some key insights about yourself. If your family moves often, you can use take this prompt as an opportunity to explain your adaptive personality and how you deal with unfamiliar situations.

 

Or, instead of focusing on the experience of changing between locations, you can also discuss the impact of each individual place on you — how has each location contributed to who you are today? For example, maybe your disparate experiences with living in rural China and then metropolitan New York have played a large role in shaping your unique outlook on life.

 

If you’ve always lived in the same place, then fear not — there’s an opportunity to shine here as well. You can discuss the impact on your life of the location that you currently reside in. People are often products of their environments — how has your environment made you who you are today? Be careful not to overlap your answer with the next essay’s, though. Since the next question asks about a community that you come from, if you are not careful you might end up discussing similar concepts, resulting in a “waste” of an answer opportunity.

 

One unique angle to approach this question is to interpret the phrase “where you have lived” in a different way. Most students will assume that Brown is asking about the times that your family has moved to a new location, a la moving trucks and new apartments/houses; however, you can also interpret it to mean the different spaces that you have occupied.

 

For example, maybe you’ve shared a bedroom with your older brother for as long as you can remember, but one day you moved into a new room by yourself. You could potentially use this situation as a launching pad for discussing the importance you place on independence.

 

Or maybe you’ve always considered yourself to have multiple homes away from home. Especially if you possess a very strong extracurricular passion to back this interpretation up, you might want to talk about how you considered yourself to “live” in the local community center, the museum, or the art studio. Again, if you find yourself unable to write answers that don’t overlap with the next prompt, then thinking outside of the box might help here.

 

We all exist within communities or groups of various sizes, origins, and purposes; pick one and tell us why it is important to you, and how it has shaped you. (100 word limit)

 

This prompt is very similar to the background one for the Common App, and you should highlight a different community/group that you belong to if you choose that prompt for the Common App. While you may be tempted to discuss your ethnicity or nationality in response to this prompt, it is difficult to do so without drawing on clichéd themes because of the 150-word limit.

 

Instead, you should probably draw on an extracurricular activity, friend group, or family. When you consider this group, the focus should be primarily on explaining the group’s impact on you. You should only spend one or two sentences explaining the group — the remainder of the essay should talk about interactions with the group and analyze them.

 


Submit Your College Essay

 

Brown-RISD Dual Program

 

In choosing to apply for the Brown-RISD A.B./B.F.A. dual degree program, your interests and future plans will be influenced and enhanced by the courses offered by both colleges. We are curious as to why you have chosen to apply for this specific dual-degree program; please tell us your reasons for selecting it, and what you envision as its impact on your education and career. (500 word limit)

 

The Brown-RISD program is designed to give students an opportunity to blend a Brown undergraduate education with the artistic majors and options available at the Rhode Island School of Design. You should have a very clear interdisciplinary artistic-academic or career goal in mind with this essay — just describing a general interest in art and another subject is not specific enough for the program.

 

Since one of the short-essay prompts asks you about your choice of major already, your primary focus should be on the artistic field you plan to study at RISD and the interdisciplinary application therein. While the prompt simply asks for your reasons for selection, the admissions committees also want to know about your qualifications for the program, and with that in mind, you should include some reference to relevant experience (whether extracurricular or in school) that will simultaneously serve as a reason and qualification for your application.

 

PLME (Program in Liberal Medical Education)

 

Most high school seniors are unsure about eventual career choices. What experiences have led you to consider medicine as your future profession? Please describe specifically why you have chosen to apply to the Program in Liberal Medical Education in pursuit of your career in medicine. Also, be sure to indicate your rationale on how the PLME is a “good fit” for your personal, academic, and future professional goals. (Please limit your response to this question to 500 words.)

 

This is a pretty standard “Why medicine?” prompt, which means that you should use many of the same tactics as you would for that type of essay (see our overview to 7-year med programs ). To provide a brief rehash, in order to convey why a guaranteed-admissions program is a good “fit” for your goals, there are few different things you need to discuss.

 

First, you need to discuss why you are qualified for medicine; namely what sort of extracurricular activities did you do in high school that were related to medicine, whether tangentially or directly. More specifically, you want to convey your abilities in two key areas: the scientific side of medicine (i.e. the ability to understand and cure diseases), and the humanistic side of medicine (the ability to connect with patients and care for them).

 

Patient care experience is a big plus for this part of the essay, and experiences such as volunteering at a nursing home or shadowing a physician are great enhancers. In the process of outlining your qualifications, be sure to discuss why you enjoy each of those two facets of medicine.

 

The final thing you want to address is why specifically an accelerated program. Simply saying that you want to save time (the real reason for many applicants) can backfire. Instead, if you have an application with lots of medical and science extracurricular activities, you can speak about why those activities solidified your desire to do medicine. Otherwise, if your resume is more balanced, you can resort to saying that you are committed to medicine because you already spent high school exploring other fields.

 

Since the Program in Liberal Medical Education espouses a broad-based liberal education, please describe your fields of interest in both the sciences and the liberal arts. Be specific about what courses and aspects of the program will be woven into a potential educational plan. (Please limit your response to this question to 500 words.)

 

(Remember, both prompts are required; please limit your response to each question to 500 words.)

 

Brown’s PLME is unique in that it is one of few guaranteed-admission medical programs that offers students the opportunity to blend liberal arts with the science-heavy curriculum of most medical programs. Accordingly, they want to see that you have some significant connection with and interest in liberal arts fields while applying to the program.

 

You should definitely do some research on the specifics of Brown’s PLME. Be sure to highlight specific research or academic opportunities in your essay, and even drill down into specific courses if you can find ones that meet your needs. Beyond the academics of the program, you should also highlight some sort of humanistic question or skill you are trying to develop. In particular, given the complexity of modern medicine, outlining a desire to learn about fields like medical economics or medical ethics could be extremely beneficial.

 

With these tips, you should be well on your way to writing the perfect Brown Supplement. Best of luck from the CollegeVine team!

 

For more help on applying to Brown, feel free to check out these posts:

 

  • Ultimate Guide to Applying to Brown
  • How to Write the Brown Essays (2015-2016)
  • Essay Guides to the US News and World Report Top 100 Colleges

 

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CollegeVine College Essay Team

CollegeVine College Essay Team

Our college essay experts go through a rigorous selection process that evaluates their writing skills and knowledge of college admissions. We also train them on how to interpret prompts, facilitate the brainstorming process, and provide inspiration for great essays, with curriculum culled from our years of experience helping students write essays that work. Learn more about our consultants
CollegeVine College Essay Team

Latest posts by CollegeVine College Essay Team ( see all )

  • How to Write the Pomona College Essays 2018-2019 – October 1, 2018
  • How to Write the University of Washington Application Essays 2018-2019 – October 1, 2018
  • How to Write the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Essays 2018-2019 – October 1, 2018

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CollegeVine College Essay Team

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Short bio
Our college essay experts go through a rigorous selection process that evaluates their writing skills and knowledge of college admissions. We also train them on how to interpret prompts, facilitate the brainstorming process, and provide inspiration for great essays, with curriculum culled from our years of experience helping students write essays that work. Learn more about our consultants

Other articles by CollegeVine
  • How to Write the Pomona College Essays 2018-2019

    10 min read
    12th Grade , College Essays , Essay Breakdowns , Grades

  • How to Write the University of Washington Application Essays 2018-2019

    8 min read
    12th Grade , College Essays , Essay Breakdowns , Grades

  • How to Write the University of Michigan – Ann Arbor Essays 2018-2019

    10 min read
    12th Grade , College Essays , Essay Breakdowns , Essay Breakdowns , Grades , University of Michigan

View all

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