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Example essays

Look at these critical essays written by Sussex students (click on the essay image to view). Think about what we covered in the section on Critical writing and ask yourself if the essays fit with this guidance. How easy is it to follow the student’s argument? How do they use evidence to support their argument? Think about the feedback you would give and compare it with the tutor’s feedback.

  1. Second year student: English Literature essay  
  2. Second year student: International Security essay
  3. Second year student: Anthropology essay  
  4. Third year student: English Literature essay
  5. Second year student: English Literature essay  
  6. Second year student: Biomedical Science essay

Second year student: English Literature essay

Discuss the relation between narrative style and moral judgement in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness [ pdf 117KB ]

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s feedback – 75%

This is an astute, and often sophisticated, essay which makes its arguments cogently. One of its strengths is that you are making excellent use of citation both to support your points but also to move your argument along (for example, see double ticks on pp.3-4). There is also significant independent reading to secure an original, thoughtful approach to the question. Though tendentious, the topic is broached with a real flair for critical analysis (one is well aware of the limits of Hampson’s defence of Conrad through the paragraph on p.5). Your conclusion is deft, with a very strong sense of the complexity of the issues. There is also the possibility, of course, that Conrad might identify with Marlow while at the same time undercutting his ‘racism’ not by expressing alternative perceptions but by plotting (see Peter Brooks, READING FOR THE PLOT as one way into this; Toni Morrison’s PLAYING IN THE DARK is another take on Achebe’s position).

Second year student: international Security essay

Discuss with examples how and why major international actors have been perceived as failing the victims of genocide [ pdf 98 KB ]

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s Feedback – 73%

This is a well structured and fluently written essay with a clear argument, well done. The examples are appropriate and the evidence and quotations you have chosen highlight your argument well. Excellent set of readings.
You could do more to say specifically why Bosnia, Rwanda and Armenia are cases of genocide at the start of the essay ? perhaps compare them against the UN Convention. You say they are all cases of genocide, but are they all exactly the same? Are there any differences between them that are of importance when considering outsiders’ failure to prevent/end them?
To push your argument further, think about the reasons why major international actors fail the victims of genocide: you give a few reasons, such as political and economic interests, reputation, the desire to avoid costly and indeterminate conflicts, UN bureaucratic inertia and so on. Could you systematise these at all? Are the reasons the same in each case, such that you can make a general claim, or does it vary case by case?
In the bibliography, make sure you give the publisher of books.

Second year student: Issues in Contemporary Anthropology essay

Explore the meaning of ‘radical evil’ and the ‘banality of evil’ and how they might relate to understandings of evil using the cases of Idi Amin and Adolf Eichmann [ pdf 50 KB ]

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s Feedback – 75%

Deals confidently with very complex issues (Arendt’s ‘banality of evil’ vs Zizek’s ‘radical evil’). Focuses on Leopold’s work, but extends it considerably. Rather longer than expected, but a well constructed argument, and generally well written (however p.2 ‘Disobeying orders was not an option for Eichmann…. As a result conveying their agency the other Nazi officials do not qualify as banal’ is unclear & may misrepresent Arendt’s argument p.3 some confusion over Pottier’s & Leopold’s position. ). Interesting and original attempt to compare Arendt’s analysis with Zizek’s in relation to Amin. The conclusion needs more explanation about what is meant by ‘everyday understandings of evil….what one refers to with the word in the on a daily basis’ (sic) (Shame to have such a typo in the final sentence!). Nevertheless, a very good, thoughtful and original argument.

Third year student: English literature essay

Laurence Sterne and the Erotic: The Depiction of Sensibility in ‘A Sentimental Journey’ [ pdf 99 KB ]

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s Feedback – 78%

This essay is clearly-written with a an intelligent, incisive style. The piece is well-presented and very thoroughly researched. I especially liked the essay’s alertness to the cultural and philosophical contexts of sensibility. In covering this topic, you used critical and historical sources to support, rather than to dictate, your analysis. Consequently, you convey a strong sense of engagement with, and ownership of, the material. Excellent work.

Second year student: English literature essay

Is Tess in ‘Tess of the d’Urbervilles’ portrayed as being responsible for her own demise? [ pdf 40 KB ]

 

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s Feedback – 73%

Yours is a beautifully clear essay. You write very well, and your prose is delightful to read. You’ve also done your research and it shows. There is a remarkable lack of vagary about society or feminism in your piece, and you’ve picked canny quotes from your secondary sources that elucidate and situate your arguments.

You’ve also located some wonderfully specific quotations from your primary source to support your argument that Hardy’s narrator sympathises with Tess. Some of your close readings are wonderfully astute, as when you point out that Tess implores Angel, rather than commanding him. Slightly less persuasive is your assertion that Tess is the victim of Alec’s eyes; I suspect you might have found better quotations, descriptions, or incidents denouncing Alec’s gaze.

You are clearly very good at pursuing and proving an argument. I encourage you to be a bit more experimental in your next essay; perhaps choose a less straightforward topic and see where it takes you.

Please see penciled notes throughout on shortening sentences and watching for comma splices (please look this term up in a style manual if it is unfamiliar).

Second year student: Biomedical science essay

Discuss the new insights in the understanding of Haemolytic Uraemic Syndrome and its worldwide implications following the large scale outbreak of E.Coli O104:H4 diarrhea in Germany 2011 [ pdf 680KB ]

Reveal essay

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Tutor’s Feedback

An outstanding essay which shows a complete understanding and an ability to think around the topic, especially with regards to the pathogenic features. Very good evidence and an indepth discussion, which highlights the role of the unique features of the German outbreak. Also, good use of evidence to highlight the unusual epidemiology. The essay is logical, moves step by step in the sequence of events chronologically. Excellent presentation. Very good use of diagrams, especially the one on the plasmids. Good referencing. Very minor errors highlighted on script. Download the script for more detailed tutor feedback [ 737 KB ]

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  • Owlcation »
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How to Write a Summary, Analysis, and Response Essay Paper With Examples

Updated on May 17, 2017

VirginiaLynne profile image
Virginia Kearney

more

Virginia has been a university English instructor for over 20 years. She specializes in helping people write essays faster and easier.

How to Write a Summary / Analysis / Response Essay
How to Write a Summary / Analysis / Response Essay

Summary

A summary is telling the main ideas of the article in your own words.

Steps in Writing

These are the steps to writing a great summary:

  1. Read the article, one paragraph at a time.
  2. For each paragraph, underline the main idea sentence (topic sentence). If you can’t underline the book, write that sentence on your computer or a piece of paper.
  3. When you finish the article, read all the underlined sentences.
  4. In your own words, write down one sentence that conveys the main idea. Start the sentence using the name of the author and title of the article (see format below).
  5. Continue writing your summary by writing the other underlined sentences in your own words. Remember that you need to change both the words of the sentence and the word order. For more information, see video below.
  6. Don’t forget to use transition words to link your sentences together. See my list of transition words below to help you write your summary more effectively and make it more interesting to read.
  7. Make sure you include the name of the author and article and use “author tags” (see list below) to let the reader know you are talking about what the author said and not your own ideas.
  8. Re-read your piece. Does it flow well? Are there too many details? Not enough? Your summary should be as short and concise as possible.

Sample Format

Author Tag: You need to start your summary by telling the name of the article and the author. Here are three examples of how to do that (pay close attention to the punctuation):

  1. In “How the Civil War Began,” historian John Jones explains…
  2. John Jones, in his article “How the Civil War Began,” says that the real reason…
  3. “How the Civil War Began,” by historian John Jones, describes….

First Sentence: Along with including the article’s title and author’s name, the first sentence should be the main point of the article. It should answer the question: What is this essay about? (thesis). Example:

In “How the Civil War Began” by John Jones, the author argues that the real reason for the start of the Civil War was not slavery, as many believe, but was instead the clash of cultures and greed for cash.

Rest of Summary: The rest of your essay is going to give the reasons and evidence for that main statement. In other words, what is the main point the writer is trying to make and what are the supporting ideas he or she uses to prove it? Does the author bring up any opposing ideas, and if so, what does he or she do to refute them? Here is a sample sort of sentence:

___________ is the issue addressed in “(article’s title)” by (author’s name). The thesis of this essay is ___________ . The author’s main claim is ___________ and his/her sub claim is ___________ . The author argues ___________ . Other people argue ___________ . The author refutes these ideas by saying ___________ . His/her conclusion is ___________ .

How Often Do You Mention the Author?

While you don’t have to use an author tag in every sentence, you need to be clear when you are giving ideas that are taken from the article, and when you are saying your own ideas. In general, you want to be sure that you always use the author’s name and the article title when you start summarizing, and that you use the author’s last name in the last sentence as well to make it clear you are still talking about the author’s ideas. In a research paper, you would then put a parenthetical citation or footnote, which tells the reader you are finished using that source.

Author Tag List

Author’s Name
Article
Words for “Said”
Adverbs to Use With “Said”
James Garcia
“whole title”
argues
carefully
Garcia
“first couple of words”
explains
clearly
the author
the article (book etc.)
describes
insightfully
the writer
Garcia’s article
elucidates
respectfully
the historian (or other profession)
the essay
complains
stingingly
essayist
the report
contends
shrewdly
Different ways to indicate who said what (and how, and where).

Sample Essays

  • Men and Women in Conversation : Example response essay to Deborah Tannen’s article about how divorce can be prevented if people learn the communication signals of the opposite gender.
  • Response Essay about Getting a Tattoo: Responds to a personal experience article from the New York Times about a man who gets a dragon tattoo.
  • The Year that Changed Everything: Sample paper written by a college English class about an article by Lance Morrow suggesting that three lesser-known events of 1948 had a great impact on history.

Transition Words List

Contrast
Adding Ideas
Emphasis
Although
In addition
Especially
However
Furthermore
Usually
In contrast
Moreover
For the most part
Nevertheless
In fact
Most importantly
On the contrary
Consequently
Unquestionably
Still
Again
Obviously
For a complete list, see my Hub “Easy Words to Use as Sentence Starters.”

Are you doing this paper for

Analysis

How is this written?

Who is the audience?

Is it effectively written for that audience?

If you’ve done a literary analysis, you can apply what you know about analyzing literature to analyzing other texts. You will want to consider what is effective and ineffective. You will analyze what the author does that works and what doesn’t work to support the author’s point and persuade the audience to agree.

Analysis requires knowing who the author is trying to persuade and what he or she wants the audience to think, do, or believe.
Analysis requires knowing who the author is trying to persuade and what he or she wants the audience to think, do, or believe. | Source

Using TRACE for Analysis

Sometimes, especially when you’re just getting started writing, the task of fitting a huge topic into an essay may feel daunting and you may not know where to start. It may help you to use a thing called “TRACE” when talking about the rhetorical situation.

TRACE stands for Text, Reader, Author, Context, and Exigence:

Text, Reader, and Author are easy to understand. When writing the analysis, you need to think about what kind of text it is and what the author wanted to have the audience think, do, or believe. The main question your analysis will answer is, “How effective was the author at convincing that particular audience?”

Context means several things: how the article fits into the history of discussion of that issue, the historical moment in time when the article is written, and the moment in time when a person reads the article.

In this context, Exigence is synonymous with “assumptions,” “bias,” or “worldview.”

Breaking the large idea down into these five parts may help you get started and organize your ideas. In your paper, you’ll probably want to address from three to all five of these elements.

Ideas for How to Write Your Essay
Ideas for How to Write Your Essay

Step by Step Sample

Each of the following elements can be one paragraph of your analysis. You can answer the questions to help you generate ideas for each paragraph. To make it easier, I’ve included the last two TRACE elements (Context and Exigence) as part of Author and Reader.

Text

  1. How is the essay organized? What is effective or ineffective about the organization of the essay?
  2. How does the author try to interest the reader?
  3. How well does the author explain the main claims? Are these arguments logical?
  4. Do the support and evidence seem adequate? Is the support convincing to the reader? Does the evidence actually prove the point the author is trying to make?

Author

  1. Who is the author? What does he or she know about this subject?
  2. What is the author’s bias? Is the bias openly admitted? Does that make his or her argument more or less believable?
  3. Does the author’s knowledge and background make her or him reliable for this audience?
  4. How does the author try to relate to the audience and establish common ground? Is it effective?
  5. How does the author interest the audience? Does she or he make the reader want to know more?
  6. Does the author explain enough about the history of this argument? Is anything left out?

Reader

  1. Who is the reader?
  2. How would they react to these arguments?
  3. How is this essay effective or ineffective for this audience?
  4. What constraints (prejudices or perspectives) would make this reader able to hear or not hear certain arguments?
  5. What is the exigence (events in this moment in time which affect the need for this conversation) that makes the audience interested in this issue?

Professional Sample SAR

Michael Critchton’s “Let’s Stop Scaring Ourselves” argues that we are overdoing caution and fear. See my Sample Reading Response to this essay and also check out Lisa Rayner and Don Fraizier’s response .

Sample Analysis Format

Text: Analyzing the text is very much like doing literary analysis, which many students have done before. Use all of your tools of literary analysis, including looking at the metaphors, rhythm of sentences, construction of arguments, tone, style, and use of language. Example:

The organization of “essay title” is effective/ineffective because ___________ . The essay’s opening causes the reader to ___________ . The essay’s style is ___________ and the tone is shown by ___________ . The language used is___________ . The essay’s argument is constructed logically/illogically by ___________. The essay is organized by ___________ (give a very brief description of the structure of the essay, perhaps telling where the description of the problem is, where claims are made, and where support is located—in which paragraphs—and why this is effective or ineffective in proving the point).

Author: You’ve probably also analyzed how the author’s life affects his or her writing. You can do the same for this sort of analysis. For example, in my sample reading the response about Michael Crichton’s “Let’s Stop Scaring Ourselves” article, students noted that the fact that Crichton is the author of doomsday thrillers like Andromeda Strain and Jurassic Park makes his argument that we shouldn’t pay much attention to current doomsday scenarios like global warming rather ironic. If you don’t know anything about the author, you can always do a quick Google Search to find out. Sample format:

The author establishes his/her authority by ___________ . The author’s bias is shown in ___________ . The author assumes an audience who ___________ . He/She establishes common ground with the audience by ___________ .

Reader: You can write this section by inferring who the intended reader is, as well as looking at the text from the viewpoint of other sorts of readers. For example,

Readers are interested in this issue because of the exigence of ___________. Constraints on the reader’s reaction are ___________. I think the reader would react to this argument by ___________. I think that the author’s ___________ is effective. ___________ is less effective because ___________ includes ___________. The support is adequate/inadequate and is relevant/irrelevant to the author’s claim.

How do you write your papers?

Response

Response answers:

What do you think?

Does this article persuade you?

How to Write

Generally, your response will be the end of your essay, but you may include your response throughout the paper as you select what to summarize and analyze. Your response will also be evident to the reader by the tone that you use and the words you select to talk about the article and writer. However, your response in the conclusion will be more direct and specific. It will use the information you have already provided in your summary and analysis to explain how you feel about this article. Most of the time, your response will fall into one of the following categories:

  • You will agree with the author and back your agreement up with logic or personal experience.
  • You will disagree with the author because of your experience or knowledge (although you may have sympathy with the author’s position).
  • You will agree with part of the author’s points and disagree with others.
  • You will agree or disagree with the author but feel that there is a more important or different point which needs to be discussed in addition to what is in the article.

How will this article fit into your own paper? How will you be able to use it?

Questions to Help You

Here are some questions you can answer to help you think about your response:

  1. What is your personal reaction to the essay?
  2. What common ground do you have with the author? How are your experiences the same or different from the author’s and how has your experience influenced your view?
  3. What in the essay is new to you? Do you know of any information the article left out that is relevant to the topic?
  4. What in this essay made you re-think your own view?
  5. What does this essay make you think about? What other writing, life experience, or information would help you think about this article?
  6. What do you like or dislike about the essay and/or the ideas in the essay?
  7. How much of your response is related to your personal experience? How much is related to your own worldview? How is this feeling related to the information you know?
  8. How will this information be useful for you in writing your own essay? What position does this essay support? Or where might you use this article in your essay?

Sample Format

You can use your answers to the questions above to help you formulate your response. Here is a sample of how you can put this together into your own essay (for more sample essays, see the links above):

Before reading this article, my understanding of this topic was ___________. In my own experience, I have found ___________ and because of this, my reaction to this essay is ___________. Interestingly, I have ___________ as common ground with the author/audience. What was new to me is ___________. This essay makes me think ___________. I like/dislike ___________ in the essay. I will use this article in my research essay for ___________.

Questions & Answers

  • What is a strong opening for a response essay in letter form?

    After the salutation, you…
    Helpful 9
  • I have to summarize and respond to an article. How would I start my thesis?

    Your thesis is the main idea…
    Helpful 12
  • How can I summarize an essay?

    The best way to summarize an essay is to start by quickly reading it through. After you read it once, write down what you think the main idea of the author is (or pick the one sentence which seems to tell the main point or thesis of the article). Next, read it again more slowly. This time, underline or highlight the main topic sentence in each paragraph. Then, re-write each of these sentences in their own words either on a hard copy of the essay or in a Word document. Now you can take all of those re-written topic points and use those as the basis of your summary. Re-read all of those sentences, and you should have all of the main ideas of the essay. If you realize there is something missing, then you will have to write that in. However, you aren’t finished yet because your summary needs to flow like a smooth paragraph. So take what you’ve written and re-write it to have the sentences make sense and flow together. Use my Easy Words for Starting Sentences article to help you use the transition words that show the linking of ideas (next, furthermore, moreover, however, on the one hand, not only, but also). If you want to do a really exceptional job, once you have finished your summary, you should go back and look at the original article one last time. Compare your summary with the article and ask yourself these questions:

    Have I made the main point of the article clear?

    Do I explain what the author of the article wanted the reader to think, do, or believe?

    Do I give all the main reasons for the author to write this article?

    Helpful 15
  • What should the conclusion to a SAR paper be?

    In a SAR paper, the conclusion should usually be your response to the article. That means that you will tell the reader what you think about it, including whether you liked it, what you learned from it, how it reminded you of something in your own experience, or how it changed your thinking.

    Helpful 5
  • How do you write an opinion analysis?

    You might want to discuss…
    Helpful 1

© 2011 Virginia Kearney

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Comments


  • profile image

    [email protected] 

    8 days ago

    Thank you so much… This is really very helpful 🙂

  • profile image

    Q_Q 

    2 weeks ago

    Thank you so much. This is a really helpful material

  • profile image

    ibrahima barry 

    5 months ago

    This is a very helpful material. Thanks so very much!

  • profile image

    James 

    7 months ago

    I found this pretty helpful. Thanks!

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    7 months ago from United States

    Hi Rezvan, to prepare for your exam, you should practice following the steps I show you here and you should read all of my example articles. You can also look at my article about summary and response. You should ask your instructor whether your analysis is supposed to include a personal response. Sometimes, the "response" part is included in the analysis. If it is not, that can be a good way to start the article, by talking about your expectations before reading and then how you thought after reading. What did you think this was going to be about? Or judging from the title, what would most people think this is about? That can be a good way to introduce your paper, especially if the topic turns out to be a surprise. Another simple way is just to state the main idea of the article in one sentence. A third introduction would explain the context of the publishing of the article or the cultural circumstances that most people would know about that topic.

  • profile image

    Rezvan 

    7 months ago

    Hi Virginia,

    Thank you so much for the amazing information. I have a question for you.

    I have an exam in 2 days that will ask me to write to summarize and analyze" an article. I wonder how it looks like to have both a summary and analysis! I am a bit confused about how to structure it and how to start my introduction.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    8 months ago from United States

    I’m not sure how you can do a personal response without using a personal pronoun. However, if that is your assignment, you can say: This article makes the reader feel… The author is believable because…. The current situation of ….. would remind a reader that….

  • profile image

    Somok 

    8 months ago

    I have to write a response essay today, and I cannot use personal pronoun like I, You, We, Us. I’m so confused

  • profile image

    Imtiaz Ali 

    9 months ago

    i am very thankful to you.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    10 months ago from United States

    Hi Karen! I’m so glad that this information helped you. I hope you will share this with other students. I know that many English instructors are graduate students who are not terribly experienced teachers and have a lot of work to do in their own studies. After over 20 years of focusing on teaching writing, I wanted to share what I had learned from my students about how to write these essays more clearly and easily. Most of my information comes from working with students and analyzing their essays to see what worked best.

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    Karen Kenny 

    10 months ago

    Once again, thank you! I wish I would’ve seen these articles at the beginning of my English class! You provide the type of information that I can easily follow. I have an instructor for my class this semester that has not made herself available for classes or who bothers to answer emails or texts. Had I known about this site, I think I would’ve done just fine taking my class online!

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    Sofia 

    11 months ago

    It helped me too much ! thank you from Italy

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    Ashley 

    11 months ago

    I really enjoyed this page and found the examples very helpful!

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    ling 

    12 months ago

    Appreciated for your effort!

    It does helped me a lot!

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    12 months ago from United States

    Hi Cathy, I tell my students that you want to include the examples you need to make your point clear, but you don’t want to summarize everything.

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    Cathy 

    12 months ago

    Hello, Thank you so much for your guide. Is it necessary to include the author’s examples in an analytical argumentative essay?

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    13 months ago from United States

    Rodsy, I’m so glad that this has helped you. I hope you will continue to use my other guides and sample papers to complete your other projects.

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    Rodsy Karim Taseen 

    13 months ago

    Hello!

    Thank you so much for making it easy. Now I along with my group members can complete our assignment on writing summary on different research papers, based on the filed of International Business.

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    Rory 

    15 months ago

    Thank you so much! I really appreciate the effort put into your work. 🙂 this will really help me now and in future.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    16 months ago from United States

    Hi, Chloe! It would depend in part what sort of assignment you’ve been given. Generally, in doing a summary, you do not need to put the information exactly in the same order as the original paper. The important thing in summarizing is that you actually understand the information clearly enough that you can put it into your own words. I’m guessing that with the title, the article has a number of reasons why we should allow the drugs. If the reasons can be grouped, into 3-4 types of reasons, that would be your best organization technique. For example, I can image that the reasons to allow performance enhancing drugs are probably:

    We can’t prevent athletes from getting around the rules.

    We have better athletic contests if we allow drugs.

    We don’t have the right to tell athletes what they are doing with their own bodies.

    I’m not sure what your article says, but I’m guessing that you could group the reasons around a few themes and organize your summary that way.

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    Chloe 

    16 months ago

    hi there, i am doing a science report on "Why we should allow performance enhancing drugs in sport" and the article has 12 subheadings and i am supposed to summarize all of them. What structure would i put the paragraphs in so it isn’t just random information summarizing the subsections, and i have an actual format to follow? Thank you 🙂

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    16 months ago from United States

    Hi, Brad! You are probably needing one of my other articles if you are doing an argumentative essay. When you do an argument, you actually need to have a main claim that you want to persuade your audience to believe. The analysis part of that sort of essay means that you evaluate the pros and cons of other ideas about that claim. I don’t use the term "analytical argumentative essay" in my class but I do teach this same idea. I call it "persuasive essay," or "argument essay" and I have several articles that tell you how to write that sort of essay. Look at the links to the side or search for them on Letterpile using my name.

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    brad 

    16 months ago

    Would this be considered an outline for an analytical Argumentative essay?

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    18 months ago from United States

    Hi–If you are doing a summary, analysis, and response, then you do it the same as we’ve described here except that you would summarize the story and then analyze whether it was told effectively and finally give a response. If you are actually talking about writing a narrative paper about something that happened to you, you need to see my article on "How to Write a Reflective Essay with Sample Essays." Search for it on Letterpile or on my profile page.

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    cletusoe12 @gmail.com 

    18 months ago

    How can I write a story of a personal encounter in an accident. In narrative essay. Please can you give me example?

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    18 months ago from United States

    Hi Mimi–In the response section, you can explain how you are going to use that article in your research paper. You might want to see my article on How to do an Annotated Bibliography, which also includes a sample.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    18 months ago from United States

    Glad this is helpful to you Flor. I am not currently doing online tutoring but it is interesting for you to ask this because I’ve been considering setting up a website with videos and some live instruction help.

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    Flor 

    18 months ago

    what a great way to explain you have used here. Are you interested in doing tutoring online? I would love to have the opportunity to be tutor by you.

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    Mimi 

    18 months ago

    Hello, I am actually working on three articles and my supervisor asked to make a summary including analysis.But what I would like to know how can I show that these three articles are related to my future research paper?how can I analyze them?can you please help me?

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    Shelbee 

    20 months ago

    I love the way this website gives steps and examples. I love how you can distinguish all of this into your on understanding. All of this explaining is a great source for anything. You have to love everything about this site. This is the best.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    22 months ago from United States

    Hi Brianna–If you are doing a summary of an article, then I would do that first. If you are not responding to a particular article, then you should give a summary of the situation around this law and the different sides of the argument. Then pose a question which is interesting to you. Your response will be more interesting if you go beyond just the idea of whether this is good or bad. Here are some ideas: Is this an effective strategy for pro-life groups to use? Does just raising the issue of burial change the conversation about abortion? Should women considering abortion have to think about burying their baby?

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    Brianna 

    22 months ago

    How can I come up with a theme for my response paper. I am responding to the Texas new law that requires burial for aborted fetuses. Any ideas?

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    22 months ago from United States

    Thanks for letting me know Seza! This type of essay is not very well explained in many textbooks and that is what led me to write these instructions and ask my students to post examples. Since I’ve been using these instructions, I’ve found my students do a much better job at writing these kinds of essays, which is important because the thinking you do while writing these essays is what prepares you for doing good research.

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    Seza 

    22 months ago

    This post has been of great help for me and my friends. Thank you very much.

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    Tessa 

    22 months ago

    Excellent lesson. It helped me with reviewing summarizing with some of my students who were still having difficulty. I especially liked the chart. However, please change adjective to adverbs.

    Thanks for the information

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    L.M. H. 

    2 years ago

    Very good insight on "analysis" description.

    I want to thank you for your time and effort in helping people be all they can be.

    Keep up the great work

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    2 years ago from United States

    Thanks Singapore! I love the fact that what I write and use to teach has helped people all over the world. I’m approaching 8 million views now!

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    Singapore 

    2 years ago

    Thanks from Singapore! It’s for literature 🙂

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    2 years ago from United States

    Thanks Simon! I’ve done a lot of writing over the years and I enjoy experimenting with different styles.

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    Simon 

    2 years ago

    I like the style of your post writing. It’s very rare to find something like this

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    Abdullah 

    2 years ago

    Hi

    This my second semester in the university and I have to write. Analysis essay I find your site very helpful for me. Really thank you

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    2 years ago from United States

    Hi Ercan! Since I started writing online in 2008, I’ve been amazed to see people from all over the world reading my work and being helped by the information I’ve developed for my students at college here in the United States. Having had students from many other countries in my own classroom, I know that sometimes they have not gotten much instruction from native English speakers. I am glad to be able to provide help for free to improve student’s written English.

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    Ercan Öztoktay 

    2 years ago

    Thanks so much from turkey

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    John 

    2 years ago

    My first time to write a summary of a 4-page research paper, this useful article really helped me, thanks 🙂

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    Bruk 

    2 years ago

    I don’t know why I should go to school. This is the right place. It’s helping me in my English composition 2 class.thank you.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    2 years ago from United States

    Hi Ed, I’m not sure what your instructor means by writing with authority. They may mean they want you to quote reliable, authoritative sources. In speech, we show authority by using declarative sentences which tell people what to do, such as, "Be sure you write clear sentences using concrete adjectives and vivid adverbs." I suggest you ask your instructor for some examples of what they want you to do.

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    Ed 

    2 years ago

    Hello Professor Lynne. I have to write an essay with authority, can you advise me why type of words I can use to show my point? By the way the topic is dealing Information Technology.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    3 years ago from United States

    Thanks yakul for your comment. As a writer, I know I am always learning and improving too!

  • Matty Fernandez profile image

    Matty Fernandez 

    3 years ago from Passaic, NJ

    I have to turn in a summary page for Critical Thinking. You’ve helped me lots!

    Thank you!

    Please follow me.

  • Christy Maria profile image

    Christy Maria 

    3 years ago

    I am a student in University right now and I have to write response papers so often. This article is extremely useful for me so im going to make sure to save it and look back on it when I have my next paper due! Thankyou

  • hijama profile image

    Najat 

    3 years ago from Rottherdam – NL

    i like your hub, great sharing, i love the instructions

    well done.

    greeting from Hijama

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    3 years ago from United States

    Aesta–glad to know this helped you. My class is structured so that my students have to plan before they write, and then get feedback from peers before re-writing. Many of them don’t like that process because they want to get it all done in one sitting, but after they have gone through this process for a semester, they begin to realize that stopping to organize their thoughts first often means that the writing goes much more quickly. In the end, it takes less time!

  • aesta1 profile image

    Mary Norton 

    3 years ago from Ontario, Canada

    Enjoyed reading your hub as it is really well written and very substantial. I need to digest this information and start applying this in my work. I often just write spontaneously, no outline, and I organize this after. Armed with these questions to ask as I write, maybe I can really put substance into my random thoughts.

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    Lloyd Jenkins 

    4 years ago

    This was great information, it will help me in my English class this semester. Organization is key in writing a good summary and response.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    4 years ago from United States

    Organised Kaos–do you really live in Tasmania? That seems like a fairy tale place to me. Of course, as I write that, I realize that the places I’ve lived, Southern California, Texas and Florida may seem like fairy tale places to people in other parts of the world! Good luck on your college career. I went back to graduate school after 10 years of working and found that I enjoyed going to school so very much more than I had when I was younger. I actually enjoyed the chance to learn things. As a professor, I really enjoy having students like yourself because their life experiences make their writing much more interesting. Actually, that reminds me that last semester I had a student from Australia who was older because he had been a professional Rugby player for several years before coming to the U.S. to go to college and play American football. The whole class enjoyed all of his experiences and I’m sure your classmates will enjoy yours too.

  • Organised Kaos profile image

    Anne 

    4 years ago from Hobart, Tasmania ~ Australia.(The little bit broken off the bottom of AUS)

    Thanks for a great hub. Just about to go back to college after 20 years and am a little nervous about having forgotten this kinda stuff.

    Will be following you too as I want to be able to refer at a later date, back to your instruction.

    Many thanks.

    Kaos

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    5 years ago from United States

    How interesting Maddie–thanks for letting me know. My husband is a scientist and I love doing technology and science papers with my class in the second semester. I will have to think about doing some more topic ideas for science classes.

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    Maddie (: 

    5 years ago

    I’m doing this for science

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    Anarkali Suits 

    5 years ago

    “Words can be like X-rays if you use them properly — they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.”

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    Avafdree 

    6 years ago

    This page is a great method to connect to others. Congratulations on a job well achieved. I am anticipating your next

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    6 years ago from United States

    B. Leekley–absolutely! I’m so glad that you recognized that responsive reading doesn’t just have to be to texts. Anything that provides us something to think about can be put into a responsive reading. You’ve reminded me that I need to add my own Hub which responded to a Harvard Study on the effect of going to 4th of July celebrations to my links.

  • B. Leekley profile image

    Brian Leekley 

    6 years ago from Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA

    Thank you for this interesting and helpful hub. I have bookmarked it. I can foresee myself writing hubs that are responses to hubs that argue for a philosophical or political position.

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    6 years ago from United States

    I’m glad! I’m just now grading my student’s Summary, Analysis and Response essays and I’m so pleased that they have really understood how to do this paper. I’m hoping my directions this semester have been clearer. We did two days of peer editing, which I think helped. This paper is similar to the Reading Response paper, and both of these Hubs are are the very top in number of hits, so I think that many people have trouble on these essays and the textbooks don’t always describe them well.

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    mlc816 

    6 years ago

    Many thanks Virginia..you made things a lot simpler for me!

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    6 years ago from United States

    johnsdfd–good question. Yes–I should add that to the hub. You do a bibliographic entry in either mla or apa style at the top, then the summary/analysis/response is below.

  • htodd profile image

    htodd 

    6 years ago from United States

    Great post virginialynne..Thanks

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    6 years ago from United States

    Glad I helped you nico! My class is just starting on this essay now and so I was looking at my Hubviews and very surprised to find this one had over 3,000! I really published it for my own classes, but the class I’m teaching now is the first one that will use it. Guess there are a lot of other people out there needing help!

  • VirginiaLynne profile imageAUTHOR

    Virginia Kearney 

    7 years ago from United States

    Thanks! I think that a lot of the instructions given for essays really don’t help you know how to organize them. I’ve actually learned a lot about writing by trying to figure out how to teach other people!

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    Rose Clearfield 

    7 years ago from Milwaukee, Wisconsin

    Well written. I like how you break everything down.