My First Day of School

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My First Day of School MAG

Fear started taking over. I was walking into my first school in America. I had traveled a long distance from India in order to join my mother, who had been here for three years, hoping America would help my future. My father decided that I would be better off going to school here, so I enrolled in the local high school in my new town.

I was afraid how I would do. I didn’t know anybody in my classes. On the first day, I went to my second period class after
I had missed my first. I was already confused because in India the teachers switch according to periods while most of the students have the same periods.

With anxiety on one hand and fear on the other, I reached for the door knob, opening it slowly. Everyone’s eyes were on me as I entered the room. Without paying attention to them, I went straight to the teacher and asked if this was the right class. With a soft voice he answered, “Yes.” His voice comforted me a little. He gave me a sheet called Course Requirements, which I would never get in India because we didn’t have anything like that. Then he asked me to choose where I would sit. I chose the seat closest to the door instead of the corner where all of the boys were sitting. I didn’t actually want to pick a seat. In India we had assigned seats, so I never needed to worry about that. I spent the rest of the class taking notes from the image produced by the overhead projector. In Indian schools, we didn’t use the technology we had. We had to take notes as the teacher spoke.

Since it was my first day, I was confused which hallway to use, but I managed to get to my classes without asking anyone. I was very confused about when I would have lunch. It was noon. I went to my next class and the bell rang as I entered. I went through the regular process of asking the teacher if I was in the right class. She said, “It’s still fourth period.”

“But the bell just rang,” I said.

Changing from a gentle tone to a harsher one, she said, “That is the lunch bell.” I apologized. Without another word I headed for the cafeteria. I felt lucky because we didn’t have this in India. Every confusion seemed like an obstacle I had to get through to reach my goal. At the end of the day, I was on my way to the bus which we didn’t have in India either. I spotted my bus and sat down inside happily. I was thinking, Today wasn’t so bad.

As time passed that year, I developed some friendships and started to love my school. I found out that U.S. citizens have many opportunities but not everyone is using them. Some people take them for granted, not realizing that other countries are struggling.

The teachers had a fun way of making hard things so easy that a three-year-old could do them. The teachers in my home country had a more strict way of saying things. We also had much longer school days in India – 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. – while in America school was 7:30 to 2:30. The main difference I found in America is the amount I learned each day. In the U.S. schools I learned a lot less material. So, I had more prior knowledge than most of the kids in my class, which gave me an advantage. Because of these educational opportunities I feel I am the luckiest person in the whole world.





















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Essay on the First Day at New School

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An essay on the First Day at New School.

After our Secondary Examination results were out, we all were trying to get admitted in the desired streams and opt for subjects of our interest. I had secured good marks in all subjects but despite a distinction in science, I wanted to opt Commerce. I had always wanted to go for Commerce as my interests and aptitude lied there. But the problem was that my school did not offer the desired combination.

I had no other option but to look for admission in one of the other good schools which offered the subjects of my choice. It was a hard decision to make. I never wanted to leave the school where I had studied since my kindergarten. I knew everyone there. The campus was so familiar and it just felt like a second home. So I was very sad to say goodbye to my school.

Another difficult thing was to choose the right school. I spent at least 3-4 days talking to the different persons and seeking advice about the best school which offered commerce at its best in the city. I visited a few of them with my father and got the admission forms. I applied to three schools finally but I wanted to get into one of them more than anyone else.

School

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With good marks in my 10th, I had no problems getting admitted to the desired school. But it was a very heartbreaking moment to leave all my friends in my old school and to come all alone to a new one. I too was very anxious to join the new school the next day. I spent a whole sleepless night. All through the hours in darkness, I kept wondering how would be the new school. What kind of teachers will be there? How will they treat me as a newcomer? Moreover, will my fellows would welcome me or will they ignore and avoid me as a stranger? Will be the only newcomer? Will be able to make new friends? How will I manage to keep in touch with the older ones? With these anxious thoughts I did not realize when I drifted off to sleep.

The alarm woke me up and anxiously I got out of the bed to get ready to face the new day. The uniform I wore made me feel a little more anxious but I was also feeling a little excited now. The excitement, thrill and the anxiety grew stronger as I could see the school building just a few matters ahead.

I cycled more eagerly and as entered the gate, I stopped to ask the watchman about the cycle stand. He was a short, twinkling eyed and a smiling man. Cheerful he directed me towards the cycle stand. His friendly manner lowered my anxiety and I felt calmer. We exchanged a few shy greetings and with our admission slips headed for the principal’s room together.

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The principal too was very warm and cordial. He was very educated and had gentle air of authority about him. We were given a few general instructions about the school and were then asked to head for the school auditorium for the assembly. In the auditorium, the atmosphere was charged with excited and energetic students greeting each other. I was a bit shy but the students were very warm and friendly. Seeing me standing a little away on my own, a few of them came to me and introduced themselves. I also told them about myself. We instantly clicked off. They were in the same class as mine. So we went together to stand in the line.

As the assemble began, I at once felt at home. The nervousness suddenly vanished and I become more excited. After the assemble, the new students had an hour of orientation where we were introduced to the teachers and other important features of the school. All the teachers seemed friendly and nice.

After that we went to our respective classes. The school notice board too had a warm welcome note pasted by the students for the newcomers. My class too was very friendly and cordial. Our class teacher also was a very cordial and a warm person. We did not have much to do that day. So we just talked and whispered to each other. I made a few friends the very first day and that made me feel very happy.

My first day swiftly went by and by. At the end of the day, I felt at home in the new environment and was very happy to have made the right choice.

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