My Dream Job: Becoming An Elementary School Teacher

 

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My Dream Job: Becoming An Elementary School Teacher – Varsity Tutors Scholarship Essay

Ever since I was 6 years old, I have dreamed about becoming an elementary school teacher. Growing up, I always saw the countless accomplishments my teachers had made and admired their enthusiasm to inspire students to learn. Ultimately, my experiences as a child grew my interest in the field of teaching. I wanted to be known as a person who focused on children and helped them to reach their highest potential in education and more importantly, life.

Overall, I believe teaching is considered a passion that people have. Teaching is not a job that everyone in the world can do. I love to teach because I ultimately want to make a positive impact on students’ lives. I want to be someone they will look up to and remember. I want to teach elementary school because I love the curiosity that young students have, and I love to teach these children about events and subjects that have shaped our world today. I believe that I would make a fantastic elementary teacher because I am truly compassionate about students and learning. I care immensely for children’s well-being, health needs, physical needs, and also their academic abilities. I genuinely respect that every child is different. I am also very hard-working and diligent; I will never quit until the job I have set out to accomplish is finished.

As a future educator, I want to inspire students to do their best in everything they do. I want students to experience that learning can be enjoyable and presented in a variety of exciting ways. The key thing I strive to make known is that students will succeed with persistence and encouragement. I will always instill encouragement and positive feedback in my classroom in order to make the individual student grow as a person and realize their true talents and abilities.

In the future, I want to teach at South Forrest Attendance Center in Brooklyn, Mississippi, and I would like to teach 4th grade Reading and Social Studies. South Forrest Attendance Center has a special place in my heart. From 1st grade to 8th grade, I attended South Forrest, and the atmosphere of the school is unlike any other elementary school that I have ever experienced. The teachers genuinely care for their students and they have a desire to help every individual succeed in academics and in life. I want to teach at South Forrest Attendance Center because I know that I can make a difference in the lives of students. Many students come from impoverished homes and do not have role models. As an educator, I want to be a teacher that inspires my students to become the best people that they can be. While I am completing my first year of teaching at South Forrest Attendance Center, I plan on taking courses online in order to complete my Master’s degree. By receiving this scholarship, I will be able to finish my Bachelor’s degree at William Carey University and go on to obtain my Master’s degree at a university.

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WetCanvas > The Town Center > Café Guerbois > "Why I want to be an art teacher" college app essay HELP!!!

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View Full Version : "Why I want to be an art teacher" college app essay HELP!!!


Andi @ Cirrutopia
01-28-2007, 09:21 PM
Hi, all. Nothing like waiting ’till the last minute, right? Well, I need to finish this so I can send it TOMORROW. The art portfolio section of my application wanted me to answer "why I want to be an art teacher" – this is what I came up with… didn’t really proofread yet. If anyone has a spare five minutes to let me know what they think/what they’d change, I’d really appreciate it.

What four-year old doesn’t love to get dirty? To constructively satisfy the dirt-playing needs of every four-year old child, my dad signed the two of us up for “Mud Pals,” a ceramics course for children and their parents. Little did we know, the passion for pottery sparked by the class would inspire me to become an art teacher.

In the thirteen years since, I have discovered that art is a mode of expression where every child is on a level playing field, for art is a mode of expression and exploration where nothing is important outside of what transpires between oneself and the canvas. Art, for so many children, can also provide a rich and safe opportunity for healing. So often, children may not have a strong grasp on the English language, but art transcends the boundaries imposed by language, age, and education, allowing any child the opportunity to express herself in a way that allows others to learn about her.

For children who have been hurt, for children who have a story to tell, art may be the only way they can share what they have experienced. It is essential that students have access to quality art programs in their schools; it may be their only exposure to art as children. I want very much to offer to others this opportunity. I want to instill in children the realization that the fine arts are not irrelevant to life today.

Had I not been offered the opportunities to draw, to paint, to sculpt, I cannot help but wonder if I would have been stunted intellectually and emotionally. Between my art classes, and time at home with my pastels, charcoal, pencils, paint, and clay, I have explored so many ideas, relevant to both issues in the world and my own life. I have learned so much I otherwise may never have discovered. Art has allowed me to heal in a way that no other mode of expression could ever allow.

I could have no greater pleasure in life than to help other children do the same.


windsongmeditation
01-29-2007, 01:47 AM
I give you an A:thumbsup:…..Bob
It’s in your words and it sounds sincere…I wouldn’t change anything.

NorahT
01-29-2007, 08:29 AM
Sounds good to me 🙂

saintlukesguild
01-30-2007, 12:17 PM
Oh puh-leeze! Just say you are in it for the money and be done with it.

windsongmeditation
01-30-2007, 01:27 PM
Oh puh-leeze! Just say you are in it for the money and be done with it.

Toning down what I really think I will just say “What a cruel and dopey comment”. If you ask me why, I will be more than happy to elaborate further…….Bob


Bringer
01-30-2007, 02:25 PM
Hi,

Answer to the teacher « because you’re my idol» 🙂

Kind regards,

José

P.S. Good luck !


stlukesguild
01-30-2007, 07:27 PM
I find myself in the somewhat strange position of partially defending Luke here. As an art educator I remember being required to compose such fanciful essays as to why I wished to be a teacher… and I was later expected to compose still more of these as part of various application processes. Certainly, these essays are no less full of unadulterated BS than the most inflated artist’s statement or Bio. This does not mean that I do not take my position seriously (I am a professional), nor does it mean that I do not value certain aspects of the job beyond the monetary compensation (and such exist even in the sort of rough urban schools I teach in). On the other hand, every year the teaching profession loses a huge number of its new teachers/recent hirees because many of them come into the field with fanciful and idealized concepts of what they will be doing and what the job entails. Reality can by quite shocking. I have taught art for the last 5 years without a single dime by way of a budget. I have needed to beg, borrow, steal… or buy with my own money what I need to do my job. I regularly deal with students and parents who are anything but appreciative. Last week, my coworkers and I were confronted with 3 events involving guns and one instance of a student throwing a desk out of a third story window and narrowly missing a line of kindergarteners awaiting a bus. I can guarantee that as much as I might miss certain aspects of teaching and certain students, I most assuredly would be gone the next day if I were not paid… or if I were to win the lottery. Teaching is my profession (however valuable it may be) not my life.

windsongmeditation
01-30-2007, 09:50 PM
We all vaguely remember the teachers who put in the time and collected their pay. In among those teachers there were the few, or maybe just one. The one that made a difference. The teacher that cared. The teacher who said “You can do it”. The teacher you will never forget. The teacher who made learning a welcome challenge and even fun.
For me it was my Jr HS (Middle School) music teacher :music: Professor Eisley. I was a trouble maker in and out of class. My friends and I enjoyed getting attention by disrupting classes. Professor Eisley was a mild mannered man. An easy target for us.
One day he said that he had a special surprise for us. A story in music. A story called “Peter And The wolf”. We were gearing up for our usual attention-getting pranks. He told us how the characters in the story were each represented by a different musical instrument and how we should listen for the characters. He told us the story and what to listen for. It sounded like a game. A challenge. My friends where not listening but I was. I remember saying , “Hey guys, be quiet I want to hear this”. I did listen and on that day I became fan of music. Classical music. There was little music played at home and certainly no classical music. Music has been an important part of my life and my art.
It was about 10 years later that I went to a concert. There in the orchestra was Professor Eisley. At intermission I met him as he walked down the stage steps and briefly told him how his Peter And The Wolf lesson had changed my life. I shook his hand and thanked him. I could see he was touched as was I, and he thanked me for telling him about it.
If one day Andi one of your students thanks you for opening the world of art to them, what better pay is there than that? What better reason to teach?
Good luck:thumbsup: …..Bob

zarroc
01-30-2007, 11:24 PM
It’s not a challenge to open the world of art to a small child. All children love creating and all of them will draw until a certain age. Usually this age is just before they hit puberty. If I ever became an art teacher I want to teach middle schoolers. When people get to around age 10 they start thinking more in terms of what they can do and what they can’t do, instead of just whatever they feel like doing. They will stop playing make believe so much, they will probably let go of some far fetched dreams, and they will probably stop drawing. I want to show them that drawing is not a talent, it’s a skill that anyone can learn.

windsongmeditation
01-31-2007, 04:28 PM
It’s not a challenge to open the world of art to a small child. All children love creating and all of them will draw until a certain age. Usually this age is just before they hit puberty. If I ever became an art teacher I want to teach middle schoolers. When people get to around age 10 they start thinking more in terms of what they can do and what they can’t do, instead of just whatever they feel like doing. They will stop playing make believe so much, they will probably let go of some far fetched dreams, and they will probably stop drawing. I want to show them that drawing is not a talent, it’s a skill that anyone can learn.

Are you talking about children or robots? In among your contrived suppositions and generalities about children I find part particularly disturbing: “They will stop playing make believe so much, they will probably let go of some far fetched dreams, and they will probably stop drawing. I want to show them that drawing is not a talent, it’s a skill that anyone can learn.”
I have not stopped and will not stop “making believe”, and I encourage children and adults every time I have the opportunity to never stop “making believe”. I have not and will not let go of “some far fetched dreams”.
Today’s making believe and far-fetched dreams are tomorrow’s realities.
May I suggest that if you choose to teach (any subject) that you get some passion, some adventure. Take those you teach on a journey. An exploration of possibilities.
I gave a talk at a local Middle School a while back for the “Great American Teach-in.” I took a couple pieces of my art and my topic was about creating art. The teacher cautioned me to try to keep my talk with-in about 20 minutes because they have found that the children get restless and lose attention after that time. After about 45 minutes the questions were still coming and the excitement was still building. They were asking questions and didn’t want me to go. The teacher finally said “We have to let other people speak….we’ll have Mr. Stagemyer back another time.” I was competing with Firemen, Policeman, and other exciting professions.
If you don’t think that art is one of the most important subjects that you can teach, please don’t teach it………
Bob


TinaD
01-31-2007, 04:42 PM
I think the essay is excellent.

One caveat is the line…

"expression and exploration where nothing is important outside of what transpires between oneself and the canvas."

it limits the form of expression by saying "Canvas" and usually younger grades don’t do much painting on canvas, at least in my experience.

As to the posts regarding your career choice I will say it’s not a particularly lucrative profession, so I highly doubt you are doing it for the money.

I do hope you are doing it for the passion of it. My Elemntary and High School art teachers were passionate about teaching art. My middle school art teacher was more itnerested in squashing expression…she wrote on my report card…"Tina has a great deal of ability but does not take instruction well." Probably because I disagreed with her instruction, I’m still proud of myself for standing up to her.


zarroc
01-31-2007, 05:33 PM
Are you talking about children or robots? In among your contrived suppositions and generalities about children I find part particularly disturbing: “They will stop playing make believe so much, they will probably let go of some far fetched dreams, and they will probably stop drawing. I want to show them that drawing is not a talent, it’s a skill that anyone can learn.”
I have not stopped and will not stop “making believe”, and I encourage children and adults every time I have the opportunity to never stop “making believe”. I have not and will not let go of “some far fetched dreams”.
Today’s making believe and far-fetched dreams are tomorrow’s realities.
May I suggest that if you choose to teach (any subject) that you get some passion, some adventure. Take those you teach on a journey. An exploration of possibilities.
I gave a talk at a local Middle School a while back for the “Great American Teach-in.” I took a couple pieces of my art and my topic was about creating art. The teacher cautioned me to try to keep my talk with-in about 20 minutes because they have found that the children get restless and lose attention after that time. After about 45 minutes the questions were still coming and the excitement was still building. They were asking questions and didn’t want me to go. The teacher finally said “We have to let other people speak….we’ll have Mr. Stagemyer back another time.” I was competing with Firemen, Policeman, and other exciting professions.
If you don’t think that art is one of the most important subjects that you can teach, please don’t teach it………
Bob I never said art wasn’t important, and I’m not planning to become an art teacher.

By saying that art is not a talent, I’m not trying to belittle art. I think the ability to do art is innate in every human being, not just a rare gift from god. I think a lot of people who would otherwise do art don’t do it because they think they have no talent. I wish people would realise that art is something that’s possible for anyone to learn.

When I say that a lot of people give up on dreams, I’m not talking about you personally, so don’t take it as some kind of attack. I do think most kids give up on their asperations when they become teenagers. There are a lot of kids who drop out of school, go to technical school to learn how to be a plumber, or go to buisness school. I think there’s a certain age when a lot of people start giving up on what they really want to do. I don’t think that’s true for everyone, but it’s true for a lot of people. Very few people who love art and art good at it actually end up being an artist.


windsongmeditation
01-31-2007, 10:28 PM
I never said art wasn’t important, and I’m not planning to become an art teacher.

By saying that art is not a talent, I’m not trying to belittle art. I think the ability to do art is innate in every human being, not just a rare gift from god. I think a lot of people who would otherwise do art don’t do it because they think they have no talent. I wish people would realise that art is something that’s possible for anyone to learn.

When I say that a lot of people give up on dreams, I’m not talking about you personally, so don’t take it as some kind of attack. I do think most kids give up on their asperations when they become teenagers. There are a lot of kids who drop out of school, go to technical school to learn how to be a plumber, or go to buisness school. I think there’s a certain age when a lot of people start giving up on what they really want to do. I don’t think that’s true for everyone, but it’s true for a lot of people. Very few people who love art and art good at it actually end up being an artist.

I think I missed your point and in turn I think you missed mine…..No harm, no foul… Bob


stlukesguild
01-31-2007, 10:46 PM
I never said art wasn’t important, and I’m not planning to become an art teacher.

By saying that art is not a talent, I’m not trying to belittle art. I think the ability to do art is innate in every human being, not just a rare gift from god. I think a lot of people who would otherwise do art don’t do it because they think they have no talent. I wish people would realise that art is something that’s possible for anyone to learn.

Certainly art is something that is a possibility for nearly everybody. I don’t place a lot of value upon the concept of "talent". To me "talent" suggests an inate ability one is born with and as such it seemingly undervalues the very real effort that is required to mold the ability to make art into something truly good. We never hear that a scientist or a doctor or a lawyer is "talented"… they are intelligent and to attain the level they have attained the have worked hard… but artists… musicians… athletes are merely "talented":confused:.

When I say that a lot of people give up on dreams, I’m not talking about you personally, so don’t take it as some kind of attack. I do think most kids give up on their asperations when they become teenagers. There are a lot of kids who drop out of school, go to technical school to learn how to be a plumber, or go to buisness school. I think there’s a certain age when a lot of people start giving up on what they really want to do. I don’t think that’s true for everyone, but it’s true for a lot of people. Very few people who love art and art good at it actually end up being an artist.

This is something of a big assumption on your part. A lot of children have dreams and aspirations of being firefighters or baseball players or police officers as young children as well. Because a child abandons this idea should not be taken as immediatelt signifying that he or she has given up on his or her dreams. Priorites may change. You seem to have an idealized notion that the student who has abandonned on set of priorites ( the idea of being an artist) for another: becoming a plumber or going to business school has some how given up on his or her dreams. Perhaps the reality for the future plumber is that he or she enjoys working with his or her hands… is mechanically inclined… and would not be adverse to learning a trade that pays well while employing such abilities. Perhaps the future MBA has reached a point where earning a good salary sounds far more worthwhile to them than 4 years of art school and a diploma that has virtually no financial worth in the market place. Perhaps they also enjoy working with their brains… love numbers… etc… The reality of a career in art is that it is very competitive. If we are speaking of the traditional fine arts (painting, sculpture, etc…) it is even more so. There are certainly those who make a fantastic ammount of money but the numbers are not great. At a recent college lecture about the business of art one participant presented some rather telling numbers. Withing 5 years of recieving a BFA or MBA nearly 50% of the graduate "artists" have nearly stopped making art. Within 10 years the number approaches 90%. Of the remaining 10%+ who continue to make art regularly only around 5% actually earn their living from making art. Less than 1% actually make a very good living at it. Art is a very challenging career. To make it one needs not merely "talent" or rather the inclination, one also needs continual effort, time, and perserverence. I would never disuade a student from an artistic career… but I would definitely not paint a rosy fantasy either.


GhettoDaveyHavok
02-01-2007, 02:20 AM
u get an A but, good thing it aint me writing it us i would say "The reason why I want to be an art teacher because I feel like it. Essay Done." 😀

saintlukesguild
02-01-2007, 12:07 PM
Those who can do; those who can’t teach. 😆

TinaD
02-01-2007, 02:14 PM
considering many of the great masters had apprentices (which is a form of a student) it seems that they were teachers as well. So Rembrandt was a teacher.

stlukesguild
02-01-2007, 10:36 PM
Those who can do; those who can’t teach.

Of course some do both (as Tina noted) and some who take the road of teaching are never really inclined to "doing". Only a small number of the art teachers I know are truly active as artists… or even consider themselves artists. I would guess the same is true of literature/poetry/English teachers and music teachers. Many artists in nearly every field have been employed in positions far removed from their artistic endeavors: lawyers, teachers, business people, insurance salesmen, even doctors (poet William Carlos Williams come immediately to mind). Albert Einstein worked as a clerk in a patent office. he admitted that for him this was the ideal situation. If he had followed the course of most of his friends into academia and professorial positions, he admitted that the presure to produce… to publish would have all but killed his ability to slowly develop his ideas in obscurity and privacy. I personally feel the same about teaching. I am always professional… but once the school day is done the time is mine and I am able to develop as an artist at my own pace and without concern for plaesing a certain market.


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