Expository Essays: Tips, Tricks and Topics

Expository Essays: Tips, Tricks and Topics


























































































































































How to Write an Expository Essay

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For Students & Parents

How to Write an Expository Essay

Conveying Information With Expository Writing




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An Introduction to Essay Writing


Introduction

  • Choosing a Topic

  • Writing an Introduction

  • Structuring and Outlining

  • Types of Essays

  • Editing and Improving

Encyclopedia Brittanica on a bookshelf
Mario Tama / Getty Images
by
Richard Nordquist
Updated September 14, 2017

Expository writing is used to convey information. It is the language of learning and understanding the world around us. If you’ve ever read an encyclopedia entry, a how-to article on a website, or a chapter in a textbook, then you’ve encountered a few examples of expository writing. 

Types of Expository Writing

In  composition studies , expository writing (also called exposition) is one of the four traditional  modes of discourse . It may include elements of  narration ,  description , and  argumentation . Unlike creative or  persuasive writing , expository writing’s primary  purpose  is to deliver information about an issue, subject, method, or idea. Exposition may take one of several forms:

  • Descriptive/definitive: In this style of writing, topics are defined by characteristics, traits, and examples. An encyclopedia entry is a kind of descriptive essay. 
  • Process/sequential: This essay outlines a series of steps needed in order to complete a task or produce something. A recipe at the end of an article in a food magazine is one example.
  • Comparative/contrast: This kind of exposition is used to demonstrate how two or more subjects are the same and different. An article that explains the difference between owning and renting a home and the benefits and drawbacks of each is one such an example.
  • Cause/effect: This kind of essay describes how one step leads to another. An example is a personal blog chronicling a workout regimen and documenting the results over time.
  • Problem/solution: This form of exposition offers a remedy to a problem or issue. Think of a how-to article, for instance.

Structuring an Expository Essay

An expository essay has three basic parts: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Each is crucial to writing an effective and persuasive argument.

The introduction: The first paragraph is where you’ll lay the foundation for your essay and give the reader an overview of your thesis. Use your opening sentence to get the reader’s attention, then follow up with a few sentences that give your reader some context for the issue you’re about to discuss.

The body: At a minimum, you want to include three to five paragraphs in the body of your expository essay. The body could be considerably longer, depending on your topic and audience. Each paragraph begins with a topic sentence where you state your case or objective. The topic is followed by several sentences that offer evidence and analysis to support your argument. Finally, a concluding sentence offers a transition to the following paragraph.

The conclusion: Finally, the expository essay should contain a concluding paragraph. This section should give the reader a concise overview of your thesis. The intent is not merely to summarize your argument but to use it as a means of proposing further action, offering a solution, or posing new questions to explore. 

Tips for Expository Writing

As you write, keep some of these tips for creating an effective expository essay:

Be clear and concise: Readers have a limited attention span. Make your case succinctly in language that the average reader can understand. 

Stick to the facts: While an exposition should be persuasive, it should not be based on opinion. Support your case with reputable sources that can be documented and verified.

Consider voice and tone: How you address the reader depends on the kind of essay you’re writing. An essay written in the first person is fine for a personal travel essay but is inappropriate if you’re a business reporter describing a patent lawsuit. Think about your audience before you begin writing.


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How to Write an Expository Essay

Resources
&#155
For Students & Parents

How to Write an Expository Essay

Conveying Information With Expository Writing




  • Share




  • Flipboard




  • Email


An Introduction to Essay Writing


Introduction

  • Choosing a Topic

  • Writing an Introduction

  • Structuring and Outlining

  • Types of Essays

  • Editing and Improving

Encyclopedia Brittanica on a bookshelf
Mario Tama / Getty Images
by
Richard Nordquist
Updated September 14, 2017

Expository writing is used to convey information. It is the language of learning and understanding the world around us. If you’ve ever read an encyclopedia entry, a how-to article on a website, or a chapter in a textbook, then you’ve encountered a few examples of expository writing. 

Types of Expository Writing

In  composition studies , expository writing (also called exposition) is one of the four traditional  modes of discourse . It may include elements of  narration ,  description , and  argumentation . Unlike creative or  persuasive writing , expository writing’s primary  purpose  is to deliver information about an issue, subject, method, or idea. Exposition may take one of several forms:

  • Descriptive/definitive: In this style of writing, topics are defined by characteristics, traits, and examples. An encyclopedia entry is a kind of descriptive essay. 
  • Process/sequential: This essay outlines a series of steps needed in order to complete a task or produce something. A recipe at the end of an article in a food magazine is one example.
  • Comparative/contrast: This kind of exposition is used to demonstrate how two or more subjects are the same and different. An article that explains the difference between owning and renting a home and the benefits and drawbacks of each is one such an example.
  • Cause/effect: This kind of essay describes how one step leads to another. An example is a personal blog chronicling a workout regimen and documenting the results over time.
  • Problem/solution: This form of exposition offers a remedy to a problem or issue. Think of a how-to article, for instance.

Structuring an Expository Essay

An expository essay has three basic parts: the introduction, the body, and the conclusion. Each is crucial to writing an effective and persuasive argument.

The introduction: The first paragraph is where you’ll lay the foundation for your essay and give the reader an overview of your thesis. Use your opening sentence to get the reader’s attention, then follow up with a few sentences that give your reader some context for the issue you’re about to discuss.

The body: At a minimum, you want to include three to five paragraphs in the body of your expository essay. The body could be considerably longer, depending on your topic and audience. Each paragraph begins with a topic sentence where you state your case or objective. The topic is followed by several sentences that offer evidence and analysis to support your argument. Finally, a concluding sentence offers a transition to the following paragraph.

The conclusion: Finally, the expository essay should contain a concluding paragraph. This section should give the reader a concise overview of your thesis. The intent is not merely to summarize your argument but to use it as a means of proposing further action, offering a solution, or posing new questions to explore. 

Tips for Expository Writing

As you write, keep some of these tips for creating an effective expository essay:

Be clear and concise: Readers have a limited attention span. Make your case succinctly in language that the average reader can understand. 

Stick to the facts: While an exposition should be persuasive, it should not be based on opinion. Support your case with reputable sources that can be documented and verified.

Consider voice and tone: How you address the reader depends on the kind of essay you’re writing. An essay written in the first person is fine for a personal travel essay but is inappropriate if you’re a business reporter describing a patent lawsuit. Think about your audience before you begin writing.


  • Students working on expository essay.

    Samples of Expository Essay Topics

  • Illustration of the five steps of writing an argumentative essay

    Here’s How You Plann and Write a Solid Argument Essay

  • Illustration depicting the three parts of a narrative essay (introduction, body, conclusion)

    How to Write a Narrative Essay or Speech

  • College student writing at desk in classroom

    Your Ultimate Guide to the 5-Paragraph Essay

  • What Is an Expository Essay?

    Your Easy Guide on Expository Essays

  • Close-Up Of Metallic Hook Against Clear Sky

    How Do You Write an Opening Hook for an Essay?

  • How to Write Your TOEFL or TOEIC Essay

  • student writing in notebook

    Essential MBA Essay Formatting and Writing Tips

  • A male student studying in the library.

    Need Inspiration for the Perfect Thesis Statement? Read No Further

  • Student Thinking will looking at papers.

    How to Write an Essay in 5 Simple Steps

  • A student works on a laptop.

    How to Write a Persuasive Essay

  • Tips for Writing a Descriptive Essay

    How to Write a Descriptive Essay

  • How to Write an Art History Paper

  • Female entrepreneur working at desk in creative office space

    Follow These Tips to Craft an Excellent Thesis Statement

  • Heart-Dimitri-Vervitsiotis-Photodisc-Getty-Images-sb10066496d-001.jpg

    How to Write a Research Paper That Earns an A

  • Businesswoman explaining plan

    Simple Steps to Write a Persuasive Speech

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Expository Essay

Expository Writing

Essays

Writing Advice

What is the structure of an expository essay?

4 Answers

Ibrahim Abulushi

Ibrahim Abulushi

You can use this guideline in composing an expository essay

  1. Introduction
  • opening sentence – start your topic with a general statement that catches the reader’s attention
  • context- provide the information because the readers need to understand the topic
  • Thesis statement -State your arguable position on the topic that you will support with evidence in your body paragraph.

2. Body Paragraphs

  • Topic sentence – Provide the main idea of the paragraph
  • supporting evidence – textual data, cited quotes
  • analysis – explain to the reader the importance of your supporting evidence
  • transition- smooth transition between introduction and body of the paragraph as well as the conclusion

3. Conclusion

  • Gives an overview to the reader of the main idea . Dont only restate your thesis but also provide a legitimate resources.

Russell John Torres

Russell John Torres

The typical structure of for an expository essay is the traditional five-paragraph essay. This includes an introduction, a conclusion and three paragraphs for the body. This is the basic essay structure. Mostly the body paragraph are limited to one subtopic each.

First thing you need to do is to introduce the topic you’ll be talking about in the essay. End with a general statement about what the essay is going to do. you need to explain the topic with your ideas.

Each paragraph covers one idea or piece of information to do with the main topic. Start each paragraph with a topic sentence that outlines what the paragraph will be about.

Make some general statement about the topic and each of the parts you’ve explained to the reader. It will add some intensity of its statement.

James Jarden

James Jarden

Originally Answered: What are the important parts of an expository essay?

As a writer and in my own opinion

There are 2 important thing for me when writing an expository essay

Personal Response: now, we’re really in the realm of subjectivity, but we are also still explaining. Suppose you read a journal article or heard a speech. Now, your instructor wants you to write a response essay. Here you will take the author’s points, one by one, briefly describe them and then insert your reaction to those points. Do you agree?

Analysis: These essays will require that you read and really understand what you have read. Now, you will have to dissect the piece and speak to its parts, analyzing them for validity, importance, etc. You might be asked to analyze a soliloquy in one of Shakespeare’s plays. You will go line by line, provide an explanation of the meaning, and then speak to its importance in terms of understanding the character’s personality, flaws, and so forth, or to the play as a whole.

Mark Wilson

Mark Wilson

rojectsdeal provides expository, analytical, argumentative persuasive essay writing and editing services. We’ll provide you with plagiarism free customized content. We believe that the best results are all that matters, not only for you, but us. We are always committed to getting your academic work done with 100% satisfaction.

Research + Writing + Editing + Proof Reading So, at the time of planning your essay consider this format:

Introduction

Subject

Main points – atleast 3 strong points

Literature Review

Intro and explanation of point

Evidence

How point relates to topic

Research Methodology

Intro and explanation of point

Evidence

How point relates to topic

Analysis

Intro and explanation of point

Evidence

How point relates to topic

Conclusion

Restate subject

Summerize main points

Restate Topic (B and C can be combined into the proof)

Format

275/550 words per page

Double or single-spaced text, with a 1 inch margin

Times New Roman font, size 12

* Format can be modified according to university guidelines

Its tedious + Time Consuming, but its scoring.

You just have to rely on premium essay writing service.

You can get custom help from Most Trusted Dissertation Writing Service and Essay help