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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

novella by Stevenson
Written By:

  • Vicky Lebeau
See Article History
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Alternative Title:
“Doctor Jekyll and Mister Hyde”

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, novella by Robert Louis Stevenson , published in 1886. The names of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde , the two alter egos of the main character, have become shorthand for the exhibition of wildly contradictory behaviour, especially between private and public selves.

The tale, told largely from the perspective of Gabriel Utterson, a London lawyer and friend of Dr. Henry Jekyll, begins quietly, with an urbane conversation between Utterson and his cousin, Mr. Enfield. The latter tells how, returning home in the early hours of the morning, he witnessed a “horrible” incident: a small girl, running across the street, is trampled by a man who leaves her screaming on the ground. “It sounds nothing to hear,” Enfield concludes, “but it was hellish to see.” Such reticence is characteristic of Stevenson’s retelling of this classic gothic story of “the double,” the notion of a man pursued by himself, of a second personality inhabiting the true self. Stevenson gradually discloses the identity of the “damned Juggernaut,” Mr. Hyde, who disappears behind the door of the respectable, and well liked, Dr. Jekyll.

Robert Louis Stevenson.
Robert Louis Stevenson.Brown Brothers

Calm and respectable, Jekyll has secretly developed a potion that will allow him to separate the good and evil aspects of his personality. He is able at will to change into his evil counterpart, Mr. Hyde, who gives way to uncontrollable urges on the streets and alleyways of London. While the respectable doctor initially finds no difficulty in returning from his rabid personality to the sanguine one, he soon finds himself slipping into Mr. Hyde without recourse to his drugs. Unable to make any more of the drug because of an error in the formula, Jekyll’s supplies soon run out. Having committed terrible crimes, Mr. Hyde is now wanted in London for murder. Dr. Jekyll takes his own life, but the body found at his house is that of Hyde’s. It is only his confession, written in Jekyll’s hand, that reveals the truth of the man’s real struggle and identity.

This novel begins, quietly enough, with an urbane conversation between the lawyer, Mr. Utterson, and his friend, Mr. Enfield. The latter tells how, returning home in the early hours of the morning, he witnessed a “horrible” incident: a small girl, running across the street, is trampled by a man who leaves her screaming on the ground. “It sounds nothing to hear,” Enfield concludes, “but it was hellish to see.” Such reticence is characteristic of Robert Louis Stevenson’s retelling of this classic gothic story of “the double,” the notion of a man pursued by himself, of a second personality inhabiting the true self. Stevenson gradually discloses the identity of the “damned Juggernaut,” Mr. Hyde, who disappears behind the door of the respectable, and well liked, Dr. Henry Jekyll.

But identifying Hyde is not the same as knowing how to read the conflict, the double existence, unleashed by Jekyll’s experiments with the “evil side of my nature.” First, the notion of the “double” was widely popular in the 19th century, especially in German literary discussions of the Doppelgänger . Dostoyevsky ’s The Double (1846) dealt with this very subject; Mary Shelley ’s classic Frankenstein tale (1818) can be read in this light; and the theme was explored explicitly by Oscar Wilde in The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891) and by H.G. Wells in The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) and in The Invisible Man (1897). Second, Stevenson makes it clear that our propensity for good and evil are not necessarily present in equal measure, which is why when Jekyll transforms into Hyde, the clothes do not fit him—they are actually too large, perhaps indicating that evil is only a small portion of Jekyll’s total personality but one that may express itself in forceful, violent ways. Third, the story has long been interpreted as a representation of the Victorians’ bifurcated self. Jekyll is in every way a gentleman, but just beneath the surface lie baser desires that remain unspoken; he is the very personification of the outward gentility—inward lust dichotomy . Finally, Stevenson’s tale took on new resonance two years after publication upon the grisly murders of Jack the Ripper in 1888, when the psychological phenomenon that Stevenson explored was invoked to explain a new, and urban, form of sexual savagery.

An adaptation of the tale for the stage was first performed in 1887, with Richard Mansfield as Jekyll-Hyde, and several popular films highlighted the novella’s horrific aspects, from a 1920 version starring John Barrymore to a 1971 B-movie, Doctor Jekyll and Sister Hyde, featuring a female alter ego. Films starring Fredric March (1931) and Spencer Tracy (1941) were also notable. Stevenson’s story continued to inspire adaptations into the 21st century. It also spurred debate over whether its main character exhibits dissociative identity disorder , a form of psychosis , or some other psychopathology.

Vicky Lebeau

Learn More in these related Britannica articles:

  • Edinburgh: Scott Monument

    Ian Rankin on Edinburgh: A City of Stories: Edinburgh as literary metaphor
    … with his major inspiration for Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. In turn, Stevenson’s story continues to be an inspiration to contemporary authors. My own first crime novel, Knots and Crosses, was (in part) an attempt to update the themes of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, a project…
  • Robert Louis Stevenson.

    Robert Louis Stevenson: Romantic novels
    …and wrote “Markheim,” Kidnapped, and Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. The poems in A Child’s Garden represent with extraordinary fidelity an adult’s recapturing of the emotions and sensations of childhood; there is nothing else quite like them in English literature. In Kidnapped the fruit of his researches…
  • Gone with the Wind

    Victor Fleming: The 1940s
    (1941), an adaptation of Stevenson’s short novel; it was widely considered inferior to Rouben Mamoulian’s acclaimed 1931 version. Fleming’s film featured a somewhat miscast Tracy alongside Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner. In 1942 Fleming paired Tracy with Hedy Lamarr in a solid adaptation of John Steinbeck’s
  • March, Fredric: Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

    Dr. Jekyll
    …humanistic protagonist of the novel Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886) by Robert Louis Stevenson. His alter ego is the evil, barely human Mr. Hyde.…
  • Hyde, Mr.; Jekyll, Dr.

    Mr. Hyde
    >Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886).…

More About The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

5 references found in Britannica articles

Assorted References

    • association with Edinburgh
      • In Ian Rankin on Edinburgh: A City of Stories: Edinburgh as literary metaphor
    • discussed in biography
      • In Robert Louis Stevenson: Romantic novels
    • film adaptations
      • In Victor Fleming: The 1940s

    character of

      • Hyde
        • In Mr. Hyde
      • Jekyll
        • In Dr. Jekyll

      External Websites

      • Internet Archive – "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll And Mr. Hyde"

      Article History

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